Wikipedia

List of Common Misconceptions .
Historical , but if you are interested , there are other sections .
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_common_misconceptions#History

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  1. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    ?

  2. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Horse Archers were invisible
    >Early Arabs used curved swords
    >The abbasids fell because of the mongols
    >The islamic golden age ended because of the sack of Bagdad
    >Huns caused the fall of Western Rome
    >Constantine converted to christianity
    >Romans always lost to persians

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Who thinks horse archers are invisible

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        Historylets
        A lot of people think horse archers were never defeated before the invention of gunpowder/guns

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          You mean invincible.

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            Yes my bad

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          >A lot of people think horse archers were never defeated
          When where they defeated?

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            by fortifications? just because the mongols managed to conquer castles doesn't mean they did it with horse archers.

            They had siege weapons and engineers like anyone else. They also didn't win all their battles via horse archers alone

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            Like fricking countless times in history
            Since phillip of macedon, horse archers have been BTFO

            by fortifications? just because the mongols managed to conquer castles doesn't mean they did it with horse archers.

            They had siege weapons and engineers like anyone else. They also didn't win all their battles via horse archers alone

            Even in ranged battles, horse archers got btfo

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        Have you ever seen a horse archer before? Didn't think so.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        Horse archers are invisible if led well through hidden passes.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Huns caused the fall of Western Rome
      Why not? They caused one of the biggest reason for it(germoids migrating en mass)

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        Germanics would have migrated whitout the huns and they migrated before the huns
        People literally think attila destroyed Western Rome when he got destroyed in the only battle he fought against Western Rome
        Germanics caused the destruction of Western Rome. Period

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      But Constatine did convert and was even baptized?

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        He converted on his death bed wich was irrelevant

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          copium

  3. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Literally the first one

    >Lel pyramids weren't built by slaves

    Even though historical records show that many of the unskilled labourers were basically bonded labour who lived like slaves and weren't paid, only given a food ration.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Even though historical records show that many of the unskilled labourers were basically bonded labour who lived like slaves and weren't paid, only given a food ration.
      Doesn't sound too different from 20th century Appalachian coal miners.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        Who were basically slaves
        I bet you think the chinkoid child labororers who make our clothes aren't slaves lmao

  4. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    >There is no evidence that Viking warriors wore horns on their helmets; this would have been impractical in battle.[

    Is this page moronic. There is a depiction of a Viking with a horned helmet on the oseburg ship burial tapestry. Plus impracticality in battle is irrelevant since many historical cultures used impractical headdresses in battle, Romans, Aztecs etc.

    His wiki page was clearly written by pop history loving Redditors.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      It's wikipedia, what do you expect

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Horned helmets were also common in Bronze Age Europe.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        Also here's a horned helmet worn by a Celtic warrior (c. 150-50 BC)

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          This might be ceremonial
          Granted Plutarch describes the Cimbri (Who might be a mixture of Celtic and Germanic) wearing some ''impratical'' headgears
          >They wore helmets made in the guise of heads and jaws of wild beasts, with feathers attached, making them look even taller.
          There are some finds of Celtic helmets who had figurines of boars and ravens on top of them

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          >conveniently helps direct your opponent's blow into your skull

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        There are some other Norse depictions where the horns have bird heads; possibly Odin's ravens?
        Interestingly some of those engravings were part of other helmets that lacked horns

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Why is that chroniclers never described those horned helmets if Vikings wore them?
      Romans depicted winged helmets but they never wore them

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        know many romans, do you?

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        >There are very few eye witness accounts of viking age battles. Maybe zero.
        > Pretty much all writing was done by monastic monks who rarely left the monastery grounds
        > They weren't interested in giving a detailed account of the arms and armour
        > Not every viking would have a fancy horned helmet. Oseburg tapestry only has one guy at the front implying it would have only been for elites.
        >Only three viking age helmets have been recovered and two are fragmentary.

        Oh and here is an Italic winged helmet. You thick frick.

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Oh and here is an Italic winged helmet.
          It's not Roman and it's completely different from Mercury's made up helmet
          >Only three viking age helmets have been recovered and two are fragmentary.
          There are more helmets from the Vendel period
          Those are very expensive and richly decorated but also lack any horns; even though there were already depictions of horned helmets

          There are some other Norse depictions where the horns have bird heads; possibly Odin's ravens?
          Interestingly some of those engravings were part of other helmets that lacked horns

          These are probably supposed to be deities or some kind of ritual dancers

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            Well it's contemporary with Roman. But don't worry I've found a better picture of two gladiators using mercury style helmets. Feather parts are clearly organic and wouldn't exist in the archaeological record. Check mate.

            Also just because something has a ritualistic function doesn't mean that it wasn't used in battle. Inspiring the troops and invoking the gods would outweigh any supposed impracticalities.

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Feather parts are clearly organic and wouldn't exist in the archaeological record.
            The hole to insert the feathers would be still there and Gladiator helmets were never used by soldiers
            But yes, it is possible some gladiators might have worn winged helmets

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      >1 viking wears thing X, therefore all vikings wear X

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        No one said every Viking has a horned helmet. Just that horned helmets more likely existed in viking culture than not.

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          They probably existed; but i'm not sure they were used in battle
          >http://www.millennia.f2s.com/dancing.htm
          >http://www.ealdfaeder.org/v03/spear-dance.html
          All depictions seem to be in a religious context and the most expensive helmets of the era lacked horns
          I do think horned helmets were used in combat by other cultures though (Like some of the Sea peoples and Gauls)

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            But how can you disqualify battle as a religious context. This isn't from the Christian era where violence and faith are somewhat compartmentalized. The Vikings believed in a god of war, they believed that the gods could turn the tide of battle and they believed that death in battle would be rewarded in the afterlife.

            The horned spear-dancer motif is depicted twice next to a bezerker. We all accept that berserkers were likely real and that they fought on the battlefield but why depict then together if they didn't exist in the same context?

            If we can accept that some Vikings dressed in animal skin and fought in a trance like state as clear ritualistic behaviour then why is the idea of a horned helmet sword dancer on the battlefield farfetched?

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            Berserkers are mentioned in some literary sources unlike horned helmets
            But yes, i would not completely rule out they existed

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            >But how can you disqualify battle as a religious context.
            The argument is that the horns were originally ravens. Odin has two ravens on his helmet (huginn and muginn, thought and memory). Over time they were either simplified in depictions or were reinterpreted as horns.

            Given that the Celts and Germanics, and in an older period the Romans, fought to be recognized and attain glory the idea of them wearing dumb and impractical armor for spiritual value isn't farfetched. Many Amerindians did this, where they believed that proper application of Medicine could allow one to be immune to bullets. "I went into battle wearing MUH HORNS" and "I enter battle with Odin's ravens on my head, surely he will protect me" are both completely understandable as they're just two specific cultural examples of broader human universals.

            Anyways, I'll contribute: Northern Europe was continuously populated by large walled urban centers at least as far back as 1000BC, and the Celts were massive exporters of iron goods, including luxury goods, to the Roman and Greek world. These people were not ooga booga primitives.

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            I agree that the raven horns are Odin and I would imagine that warriors would want to appear like Odin in ritual context but certainly the spear dancer is linked to combat, as seen on the Sutton hoo helmet.

            I would say that the cultures that preceded the Vikings used horn motifs that were clearly not raven related, such as those seen on the Golden Horns of Gallehus. So it more likely that the horn tradition evolved to become more raven like perhaps as Odin became a more prominent god?

            I don't like the trend of historians to dismiss certain items as purely ritual because they were fancy or impractical. These cultures cared more about glory than practicality.

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            >So it more likely that the horn tradition evolved to become more raven like perhaps as Odin became a more prominent god?
            The Proto-Germanics appear to have had, in their oldest strata, a societal order based on some kind of central solar-king figure (as in, an actual living human king associated with the sun). As their contact with the Celts lead to an influx of Greek and Roman wealth, they eventually developed the warband societies that we know from the Medieval period (the Celts appear to have a similar "central king" social order that was itself supplanted by aristocratic warlords seeking ever more Roman and Greek treasure, albeit with more than just one king). These warbands became increasingly focused on warfare and violence, in contrast to the Celts who eventually "settled down" into a more peaceful Feudalism. I would argue that Odin, being the Germanic understanding of the Indo-European Sky Father, was always a prominent God, but rather that his role as the lord of the Valkyries, the Chooser of the glorious dead, the patron of bandits and raiders, expanded as this warband social order became more prevalent.

            The core ritual of this warband social order was the ritual drinking of liquor, carried by the king's wife, symbolically linking the king and his retainers as brothers. While there were of course other vessels, a common drinking vessel was of course the horn. Perhaps the transition to the horn motif being literal horns was something to do with Odin's patronage as the patron God of the warband? As if to say "Look how Odinic I am, I have the central ritual apparatus of my social order on my head".

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Plumage is not at all impractical
      Any level of impracticality is hugely outweighed by the obvious benefit
      You could say this would apply to horned helmets also though

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        The Medinet Habu reliefs show Sea Peoples fighting with horned helmets

  5. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Julius Caesar was not born via caesarean section.
    lmao

  6. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    this is just a list of postulations that brain fried socalists, who spent too much money and years of their life on a terrible degree with which they only have an entry level job and crippling debt to show, have compiled in order to try to justify their wasted lives.

    The Pyramids WERE constructed by slaves.
    The Cuse of king tut IS real.
    The Roman salute WAS used.
    Scipio DID salt Carthage.
    The Vikings WERE barbaric backwards savages.
    and so on.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      >source: trust me bro

  7. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Napoleon did not have a fetish for body odor. He did not send “home in three days, don’t wash" in a letter to Joséphine de Beauharnais

  8. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    >The Mexica people of the Aztec Empire did not mistake Hernán Cortés and his landing party for gods
    I doubt it. I haven’t read his letter yet, but that “mistake” happened several time when Columbus was napping the Caribbean and meeting the natives
    > Christopher Columbus' efforts to obtain support for his voyages were not hampered by belief in a flat Earth, but by valid worries that the East Indies were farther than he realized
    Columbus first tried to set a deal with the court of portugal but he was shut down due to the voyage not being perceived as worth it
    > Medieval European scholars did not believe the Earth was flat. Scholars have known the Earth is spherical since at least 500 BCE.
    That didn’t stop an Ancient Greek (female) philosopher from claiming the earth is flat.

  9. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Gothic Churches were not always Gray stone...

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Thank god the elements removed that garish paint

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Pretty soon they'll be godless churches.
      Beauty that people will be loathed to remove.
      So they will be a monument to all that was.

      Grandeur with no purpose, and no point.
      Pointless aesthetics. Pointless beauty.
      The masons did good work.

  10. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    what a terribly mid list. this is what the world looks like to liberal iq 120ers who dont look at history much more critically than for their contrarianism to appear smart.

  11. 3 months ago
    Chud Anon

    American school children are taught that America was founded by Black folk licking cotton

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