You're telling me all that data is passing through just four (4) wires?

You're telling me all that data is passing through just four (4) wires?

Tip Your Landlord Shirt $21.68

Yakub: World's Greatest Dad Shirt $21.68

Tip Your Landlord Shirt $21.68

  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    seems like it's just 2 wires for data

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      yeah and those 2 wires are differential so it's the same signal but with opposite polarity (or phase if you want to be an autist).

      Original USB really nailed the K.I.S.S. principle

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >differential so it's the same signal but with opposite polarity

        Actually it's just 1 wire. 2 wires are for power, another wire is just the "inverse" of the data wire.

        >another wire is just the "inverse" of the data wire.
        why?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          way less noise that way, look for twisted pair if you want an explanation

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            oh, yeah that's what I figured.
            I know about UTP/STP, just wasn't sure here. I'm not that versed in electrical signalling, only that you can't run a 50m HDMI cable alongside your 50m xlr cable and your 50m power cables or else the whole show fricks up and everyone blames you for being a moronic stagehand.
            or so i've heard.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I twisted my pair with your mom yesterday

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            You telling me all that data is passing through thin air?

            Testicular torsion is no joke

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            i twisted deez nuts last night with your mom

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          It's good for signal integrity and reducing how the signal affects its surroundings. Basically, one wire will create an electromagnetic field, your wire would be like an antenna sending out waves that could cause interference and that wastes energy or reduces your signal quality. But if you have another wire, which creates an opposite field, the fields are neutralized locally.
          Anything that transfers data at high speed electrically uses this principle. Ethernet did it long before USB. It was a good choice, even if it requires a 4th wire. You could reduce it to two wires (power/data and ground), but then the data line would be so noisy that you could reach only low speeds over low distances.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            to add to this anon, the differential (usually twisted) pair is also used for protection from noise in the environment and not just preventing emissions from the signal wires themselves.
            Basically, in most cases noise will hit both wires in the twisted pair and cause the same signal interference pattern in both, however the receiver device subtracts the two signals (hence differential) and only the data signal would remain.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Ethernet did it long before USB
            isn't PCIexpress literally ethernet

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Not literally. All these simply use serial connections with differential signalling, sometimes multiple pairs, with possibly similar electrics and line codes, but similarities should end here. SATA is another example.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Differential signalling (as opposed to single-ended signalling) has a few advantages. For one, you don't have to deal with noisy grounds/references. Single-ended signals rely on a clean (i.e. noise-free) reference voltage, which isn't always trivial to generate. By sending the same signal with opposing polarities, you are effectively doubling the signal amplitude and removing the dependence on a clean reference. This also means that you get great common noise rejection (as another anon already pointed out). However, regarding regular noise, differential signalling has no major advantages over single-ended signals (both can be balanced using differential receivers).
          Lastly, differential signalling also minimises crosstalk/electromagnetic interference at high frequencies.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            i dont get it

            The same way a wave travels in a pool. Drop a ball in the water, the water moves a little bit it's the wave, or energy you see moving. It's sort if like that.

            USB 3.1 and up have more than that

            they do a mexican wave
            no, i'm serious

            oh ok now i get it

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          If you do the integral the EM fields mostly cancel out. This goes both ways so it’s like coax but cheaper and you get pd.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          wire is just the "inverse" of the data wire.
          >why?

          The out-of-phase signals are combined and would cancel each other out, meaning that anything present after combining the signals is noise or otherwise unwanted. This is then discarded to preserve signal integrity.

          This is similar to how balanced audio connectors work, in particular XLR connectors for microphones.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Original USB really nailed the K.I.S.S. principle
        Except when it didn't. It's very complex and some choices could be considered design bugs. In the end, Microsoft and Intel engineers are bad.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          fireware and later lightning were much better (read: more elegant) solutions but unfortunately they were slow
          if apple wasn't forced to adopt USB-C they'd have eventually made or substaintially contributed to a significantly better standard of lightning, as they did with firewire, thunderbolt, HDMI, AAC, HEVC, and many, many, MANY more popular standards

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >USB-C
            This is only mandatory for power.
            >apple
            >substaintially contributed
            Apple are a cancerous shit company which would have contributed to nothing. They'd made their own system which is DRM protected so they can sell all accessories at maximum price.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            i hate apple as much as the next guy but they have created or contributed ti a lot of very ubiquitous standards
            without then we'd have no
            >unicode
            >flac/alac/aac/mp3
            >HDMI
            >HEVC/mp4
            >thunderbolt
            >ironically USB-C
            >firewire
            >ARM more powerful than a toaster
            >mice
            >GUI in general (or it would be substaintially different)
            >HLS
            >OpenGL
            >TTF
            >PDF
            >WebKit
            >CUPS
            it goes on and on. they are the largest contributor/creator of industry standards in the world and have their fingers in almost every pie you've ever eaten weather you like it or not

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Half of that wasn't invented by Apple. For example, Unicode originated from Xerox, although an Apple employee seems to have participated. OpenGL as invented by SGI, Apple deprecated it a while ago and is contributing to its decline. I'm especially resentful that you listed WebKit, because that was originally KHTML, a browser engine invented and developed by KDE open source developers. PDF was invented by Adobe.
            HLS was definitely invented by Apple, but as someone familiar with video streaming, it's a moronic webshit hack that is at least in theory inferior to other methods and that has gone too far.
            Not going to check the other ones, but what the frick, dude?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Apple, Inc. is listed as a contributor for everything in that list, although it's well known that they stole the mouse and GUI from Xerox

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Apple, Inc. is listed as a contributor for everything in that list,
            You could say that for most big companies which use things.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            cope harder, chud
            apple invented everything you know and love

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    No.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    No. Virtually nothing is passing through anything when electricity is involved. Even with continuous current. Electron are actually moving quite slowly in the medium. They are not that relevant.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Then how is the data actually transmitted?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        USB 3.1 and up have more than that

        they do a mexican wave
        no, i'm serious

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Serially. On the electrical level, it's a

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Line_code

        On the higher level, things like framing and coordinating access to the bus are added. On the highest level, you pass data packets between host and device, a bit like ethernet, but much more complex.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          but how does it get from one side of the cable to the other if the electrons don't move

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I'm not into electronics or physics, but I suppose all that matters are the electromagnetic fields they create and that vibrate around.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            this:

            I'm not into electronics or physics, but I suppose all that matters are the electromagnetic fields they create and that vibrate around.

            if you've ever seen a chain pendulum (the name escapes me) one pendulum hits the chain, but only the last one moves [effectively], it's more of an electromagnetic wave that kind of resembles a mexican wave as

            USB 3.1 and up have more than that

            they do a mexican wave
            no, i'm serious

            said

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous
          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >tiny mexicans live in the cable and move the data
            ay caramba

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            The same way a wave travels in a pool. Drop a ball in the water, the water moves a little bit it's the wave, or energy you see moving. It's sort if like that.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            it depends. Switching the voltage on/off generates a signal the (stationary on a macroscopic scale) electrons would be switching states therefore are in some kind of vibrational state which would generate a rf signal which is what transmits your data. In the case of fiber optics you are encoding information in light frequencies presence/absence of freq + amplitude+ phase can encode information. Then there is rf waveguide which work kinda like that as well but there is a subtle difference I forgot. Another cool case is magnonics which looks to encode data via spin and you get some pretty cool crossover of photon mechanics+electron stuff.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Through the change in the electromagnetic field.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Electron are actually moving quite slowly in the medium. They are not that relevant.
      It doesn't matter that they move slowly through the medium. They still make other electrons pop out the other end at an alarming rate.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    2. VCC and GND only pass power, not information.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Information is power.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Actually it's just 1 wire. 2 wires are for power, another wire is just the "inverse" of the data wire.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Univeral
    Serial
    Bus

    high speed version of this

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Remember the DB25?

      • 3 weeks ago
        baritone

        DB9 RS232 ports are just a cut down version of the 25 pin version

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Actually the pinout is different and the connector is smaller, its not just a cut down version.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    the best thread I'd read on here in months, maybe even for the year. congratulations anonymous

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Black (Global Black person Death)

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You need more?

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *