Aliens dont exist. Life started exactly once in 4.5 billion years on Earth.

Aliens don’t exist.

Life started exactly once in 4.5 billion years on Earth. That heavily implies it’s a one off event.

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Space is big.
    >Really big.
    >You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is.
    >I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist's, but that's just peanuts to space.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Yes, it is big.

      That doesn’t mean that life must exist anywhere but on earth.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        It also means that even with a ridiculously small chance of life arising on a planet (which we know is the case due to life being here) there should be numerous other planets with life on them even in this one galaxy among we have no idea how many. Granted, the odds of us ever meeting little green men in flying saucers are basically nil, but it's wrong to claim that means that there's no life out there.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          If life starting could happen more than once, it would have on earth in 4.5 billion years.

          But it didnt.

          That means that the unlikelihood of life starting outweighs the number of planets in the universe

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Possibility 1: You don't understand what you're saying.
            >Possibility 2: I'm posting in a troll thread.
            Which is it?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            What if it has happened multiple times and the different forms unified?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            We would have evidence of that in the fossil record.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            The notoriously incomplete and spotty fossil record?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            There is evidence of life not related to other life on earth.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            source?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            I mean to say there is no evidence of life unrelated to other life on earth in the fossil record

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            that's one hell of a typo then; I still don't see why you think that's relevant though.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Not if it happened during RNA world or some similarly early point in the planet's history.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >rna world
            >"history"

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Yes, RNA world is history, and it's supported by the organic compounds found on other planets, on comets, etc.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Abiogenesis doesn't need to happen again once Life is widespread and firmly established like on our planet. Not that it cannot happen again, just that whatever results of it would be short lived with micro-orgarnisms everywhere filter-feeding for organic compounds and shedding their own. Even on thermal vents there are filter tube worms around the chimneys. The niche is occupied and unlikely to be freed anytime soon.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Since life already exists, it's much more difficult for newly emerged life to thrive, to where we could find it. So it might as well be a common thing for life to emerge, just these new bacteria tget eaten by the already existing ones.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Just think of the closest star to earth. It's about 80,000,000,000 miles away. It would take us 70,000 years to get their with our best technology today. And that's the closest star lol. Space is insanely big.

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >exactly
    He says about an estimation
    >it took a big time therefore it never happened anywhere else
    ???

    And by extraterrestrial life we just don't mean alien civilizations with spacecrafts flying around the galaxy. We mean anything from microrganisms to proper ecosystems.
    A dozen of planets around in just our region of Milky-Way favorable for Life as in rocky, not too small or large with temparature cool and warm enough for liquid water. There are billions of planets in our galaxy alone and there are billions perhaps trillions of galaxies out there. Do the Math.
    The History of Humanity as civilizations is barely 15,000 years old. A miniscule fraction of the History of Life on Earth and we've only sent a man out of the atmosphere 60-ish years ago. We may become the first space civilization in our region of space for all we know.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Life on earth started because it met exactly those conditions in its atmosphere which could sustain it. Also, the checklist for sustaining life differs across Earth's species. With the vastness of space, I'm willing take my chances on that there is another planet somewhere out there that checked those boxes.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      and other kinds of life is probably possible as well

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    OP, you're clearely moronic and don't understand any of the context behind astrobiology. Let me try and break this down for you real quick
    The Universe will continue producing stars and terrestrial planets for the next 100 trillion years
    The Universe in its current state is 13 billion years old.
    In universal timescales, we are still at the beginning of the Universe. This means we could be the first intelligent life, but first doesn't mean only. You're ignoring the temporal aspect here.
    Now lets talk about non-sapient life.
    99.9 percent of life on Earth is non-sapient. Of the non-sapient life, most of it exists underwater, where its impossible to directly observe from space. There are many, many worlds out there with massive water oceans. If life is most common underwater, and if most life is onn-sapient, it means life could actually be extremely common in the universe, but its just difficult to detect from Earth. There could be life swimming on Gannnymede for example, annd that's in our own solar system, but it just doesnn't exist in a way that's obvious to our telescopes. You could argue that sapient life is a one-off event, but now you're moving the goalpost.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Space is big.
      >Really big.
      >You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is.
      >I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist's, but that's just peanuts to space.

      >space big therefore muh aliuns
      It’s the other way around. The vastness of space is nothing to the probabilities involved in chance formation of self-replication, as in, we’re talking no chance of life within the next 10^1000 universes. It’s virtually impossible to arise from chance processes and we haven’t found anything that assembles nucleotides in an abiotic, ‘intelligent’ way after 70 years of intense search

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        If it's virtually impossible then how did it happen so quickly (geologically speaking) after the Earth's formation?
        >we haven’t found anything that assembles nucleotides in an abiotic, ‘intelligent’ way after 70 years of intense search
        WHOA, 70 whole years???????

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Do you somehow think 70 is a short time in the field of biology and chemistry? 70 years ago, people still thought the brain wasn’t actively doing any work when someone’s not performing cognitive tasks lmao. We’re talking 70 years of heavy scrutiny on one of the most fundamental questions, and yet there’s not even the shadow of such a process

          >If it's virtually impossible then how did it happen so quickly (geologically speaking) after the Earth's formation?
          Life necessarily must emerge very early on the average planet for life to reach a stage at which it can at all ponder that question

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Life necessarily must emerge very early on the average planet for life to reach a stage at which it can at all ponder that question
            Didn't answer the question. If life emerges pretty much right away on a hot iron ball with water on it, I'd say it doesn't have terribly stringent requirements

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Yes, it does answer the question. You just don’t understand the anthropic principle in the most simple terms. You would not be here to ask this question at all if it had NOT emerged out of an almost fiery surface and granted life the time it needs to create intelligence. There are actual statistical papers that show that the time of emergence says very little about the probably of life, if you want me to go and find them for you

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Athishits wanted the JWST which cost more than twice that much, and now they refuse to even acknowledge the data it provides which they supposedly needed so bad.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Many non-atheists helped work on JWST and support its development. It was a collaberative effort and included many Christians who aren't anti-science like you jobless losers on here are.
      >and now they refuse to even acknowledge the data it provides which they supposedly needed so bad.
      What data? JWST is being shared by multiple institutions with different research objectives. If you mean data relating to alien life, then the planet K2-18b is providing a lot of promise but we still need more data before coming to a conclusion

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    The ultimate final blackpill is that the universe is absolutely teeming with life, but almost none of it is evolved beyond basic bacteria-equivalents with multicellular life being exceedingly rare and sapient life capable of manipulating its environment not existing outside of the Earth. The evolutionary pressures that actually led to sapience emerging within humanity are rare enough, but coupling that with extremely dactyl digits for fine manipulation and group mechanisms that allow for truly complex societies results in astronomically small odds for any life form capable of advanced civilization to emerge. Timescales are also a serious constraint, as it took no less than 3.5 billion years for humans to evolve on Earth and it's likely that most planets harboring life don't exist around stars as stable as our own.

    We're the First Ancestral Race of scifi movies, and it's a blackpill because if we frick it up here it's terrifically unlikely that anything else will emerge to fill that gap for billions of years if ever.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >it's terrifically unlikely that anything else will emerge to fill that gap for billions of years
      That's nothing in universal timescales. The universe has plenty of opportunity to create sapient life again.

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Life started exactly once in 4.5 billion years on Earth
    Because any "new" life that would start on earth would be instantly outcompeted by what's already out there

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Ok but peep this OP. Perhaps life didn't originate on earth but somewhere else and was delivered to earth on asteroids along with our water. This would explain why it showed up so quickly after the planet cooled and why it only appears to have happened once.

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Yes, really, really big

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Aliens don’t exist.
    Yes they do and ufologers provided extraordinary evidence that they're in contact with us. Please educate yourselves and stop being normies. Start with Hynek.

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Aliens are a idea from an age long past.
    As humanity progresses it will come to understand that it's frighteningly alone.
    And find the best way to approach that situation.

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    The aliens that exist right now in the universe if suffieciently advanced would stand to reason that they want absolutely nothing to do with us because we are violent and unenlightened apes. We are basicaly exiles on earth after we fricked it all up in the past. We see the universe as being empty because we are basicaly in a containment zone. A monitoring station exists on planet 9 within the Solar System.

    Humanity once ruled the stars but we started wars against other star faring species and they had to take us down. Also when it comes to alien life , you have to stop thinking in terms of lienear time, because information travels non-linearily in time and space. Thus we could be talking about intelligences that are manipulating pure energy and time.

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    It was about 6,000 years ago and it was a divine miracle

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Thing is - we haven't even concluded for sure, that there isn't life on other bodies in our ouw solar system - which is why we keep sending probes to mars, jupiter's moons, etc.

    So in no way could we say for sure that life exists or doesnt, anywhere further away. Best we can do is observe the chemical makeup of exoplanets and guess, based on what we know goes on on earth, but according to these metrics, even Venus displays characteristics of possible life with changes in it's atmosphere.

  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Space is big.
    Planets in the habitable zone of stars are already very rare, so life is very rare.
    On planets that have life, intelligent life is incredibly rare. Take Earth for example: there are millions of species and only one of that developed serious intelligence.
    Among intelligente species, ones developing advanced technology are very rare. Most human cultures never made it out of the stone age. All human inventions come from very few cultures and individuals.

    So this means exteremely few advanced species that could discover each other are spread out over extremely large distances. This wouldn't neceserily be an issue if just some of them discovered FTL technology, but it most likely impossible. The math is quite solid on the theory that nothing with a weight can travel faster than light, and proposed workarounds like folding spacetime probably aren't feasible either.

    This means that even advanced specieses are usually separated by millions of lightyears and are all limited to lower-than-light travel. Based on that, it's easy to see why it's extremely unlikely that two civilizations will ever have contact.

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