Are there any books about the experience of being a factory drone?

Are there any books about the experience of being a factory drone? I literally can't fathom that pretty much all the material wealth in the world depends on the work of busy worker-bees who perform the same action over and over again. What do these people even do? Whence do they derive joy in their lives?

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    WOrkers rights and such could look into it

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    My diary

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    people like working, they like receiving money, they are free to stop and find a new job whenever they want and are only lightly coerced by the monetary realities of food and shelter (which are much less than they would be in a return to nature type situation). so really i dont see a huge problem with it

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >people like working
      Lol. Lmao even

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >people like working
        no
        >they like receiving money
        yes

        The vast majority of people like working even if they think they don't. There's a fine line separating misery at work and misery outside of work. Most of what makes work miserable is the idea that others are working on something better than you. Work itself is a basic human need. Outside of work is only the abyss. Work, meaningless repetitive tasks are pure bliss for people. The whole video game industry is built on this bliss for example.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          we weren't born to be slaves. did humans 200,000 years ago feel the need to work?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            ...yh

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            no?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >people like working
      no
      >they like receiving money
      yes

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >lightly coerced by the reality of possible starvation
      poe's law

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Just like all animals innit

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      True. And the structure of socialism is the same as free market capitalism.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    A small but great segment in Journey to the end of the Night when he works at the Ford Factory.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >What do these people even do?
    Work eight hours a day and have a life after and before those eight hours of work. I went through that, it's just a job.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I also went through that and it was hell

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Saturday Night Sunday Morning

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    You might want to check out "Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day and How They Feel About What They Do" by Studs Terkel. The book contains several first hand accounts by people who are working menial shitjobs.

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >What do these people even do? Whence do they derive joy in their lives?
    Alcohol, sex, kids
    I think there's a part in a Bukowski novel(probably Factotum) where he works in a factory (also at a slaughterhouse in another oart)

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Working in a factory isnt that bad, its just kinda boring. If you have to hit a certain rate or part quantity the days can go by quick but its usually just being on autopilot. Spacing out while your hands do that work.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I also recommend "A Working Stiff's Manifesto: A Memoir of Thirty Jobs I Quit, Nine That Fired Me, and Three I Can't Remember" by Iain Levison.

      Levison was a sort of drifter who took whatever job he could find, mostly poorly paying shitjobs. Rather short, but highly entertaining read. Interesting glimpse into a world that is completely foreign to a white collar guy like me.

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    There was a documentary about Chinese factory workers and their personal lives over the course of years. Can't remember the title.

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    covid sort of dispelled of the notion that if people didn't have to work and had a ton of free time there would be an explosion of arts, achievement, or even happiness

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      That's just normies, though, who don't amount to anything most of the time. As gay as it sounds me and my friends kickstarted a bit of a poetry/writing group where we would sit around all day in nature and write and smoke weed. Even though nothing came out of it and we were just young, it helped me refine my style and get on the right tracks. Muscians I know recorded whole EPs in the months of Lockdown and I even know one girl who started sculpting the heads of famous communists throughout history and got so good at it she was able to start an Etsy shop.
      Anyone with a natural inclination towards the arts will benefit when not expected to work all the time, so long as they have self-discipline to actually start

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        And none of these people are even noteworthy in their respective fields!

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >bitter wagie can't comprehend doing something for personal gain and not finacial benefit or academic recognition
          must be a sad life you live. hope you make it big one day, anon

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Was Kafka?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      1) This is like saying "Portland Oregon sort of dispelled the notion that decriminalizing drugs would have any benefit to society." despite a few European countries decriminalizing drugs and being fine.
      Society is too complex for basic 'if x, then y' to be true 100% of the time and this goes both ways.
      2) Where are all these people that didn't have to work during COVID? Myself, as well as literally everyone I know, still had to work whether they had essential jobs that they had to work on-site or if they were able to work at home.

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    you can't fathom that civilisations depend on slavery?

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    The Jungle

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous
  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Goods materials food all have to be made and processed someone's gotta do it. They go to work and go home that's it it's just a job. Hobbies, loved ones you could apply that to any job anon.

  16. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    On Chinese assembly line workers producing consumer electronics in poor conditions and for little pay, there’s a good book called “Dying for an iPhone”

    There is also a small subculture of factory worker poets in China, though most of their work is either untranslated or translated very badly. Pic rel is an exception. I personally consider it one of the best poems in modern mandarin

    http://abecedarian.ist/assembly

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I'm sorry, but seeing the poem title written in simplified Chinese looks disgusting to me. I can barely even read the language, but I've just such a strong association of the style of characters and this sense of complete poverty of dignity. Maybe this actually matches the subject matter of the poem very much and is appropriate to the station of the one writing it in this instance, just it just feel like a given to me that any serious poetry would use traditional Chinese characters.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Racist or just moronic?

  17. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    You essentially assemble a product but nobody realizes how insane the amount of consumption there is. Arrive at the line you were assigned. You get a repeating task to do until you move onto the next station, depending on the line. These tasks are timed at max speed but not to the point that you'll start making mistakes or injury, although the machines need constant maintenance and cleaning. If you're slow, you get hazed or an angry manager because of quotas. Each task is trivial like making sure you're counting 2 pink pills, 3 white pills, one blue pill for each package on a moving belt. Unfortunately I forget the rate some of the belts move. It's watching paint dry but with extra pressure. You have no control over your body for hours to complete the task. Everyone hates their lives so it's a social hell.
    That good? I hope so. Idk if I can talk about specifics on the manufacturing process of the specific products but I've worked in automotive and supplements.

  18. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Sinclairs The Jungle. Post Office is obviously about a post office but it seems to be very much what you're looking.

  19. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    One must imagine them happy.

  20. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Engels wrote a rather famous one.

  21. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Not exactly what you’re looking for but

  22. 2 months ago
    Anonymous
  23. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I have worked factory jobs, am not a drone. Have done a lot of manual labor, it is physically demanding and often repetitive. It trains the body physically as well as your mental constitution.

    I've built roads, built homes, worked in factories, casinos, kitchens. Outside of physical labor, I've written books, worked as a journalist, worked as a cybersecurity contractor for the DoD, and marketed large amounts of VC stock for technology investors.

    I don't know if you have ever had to actually work a job for a living but you write "whence" and just seem high on your own farts. You refer to honest working people as "drones" and "worker bees" when even writing books is work.

    It makes me think of young college marxists who have never worked an honest day in their life and think they know what the working class is or what is means to be a part of the working class.

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