Did you know about this trail ?

Did you know that in South America existed a trail called Peabíru? It was a massive trail that connected the atlantic ocean to the incan empire. It was used by the portuguese duing colonization era. Its been confirmed a good proportion of the trail was made by giant pre-historical animals, which was later on preserved and developed by indigenous tribes.

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Not a race baiting thread, nor religious so it doesnt appeal to the haploautists and epic hoi4 gamers who post here.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Thats pretty interesting. What kind of giant prehistoric animals? Like mastodons?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Giant sloths come to mind

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I did not know about this trail, but it seems logical that Incas, or a linked network of merchants, would be interested in reaching the Rio Paraguay and the climate of the area stretching from Sao Paolo to Buenos Aires, which was similar to the one surrounding Cuzco.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Does this not imply there were other civilizations in the Americas outside of Mesoamerica or the Andes? A large trade network couldn't exist without anyone to trade with.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      of course there were. The portuguese only found out about the incas because shipwrecked europeans living along with the indians on the brazilian coast told them about it.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Interesting.
        One of these must be the one he mentioned.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Yeah, there were a lot of different tribes, but every tribe on this map belonged to the same family group. The tupis, they loved war and also didnt allow other indian families to have access to the coast

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            They weren't from the same family as you say, I'm sorry.
            >Notably, we reveal how the Atlantic coast was occupied by Amazonian peoples through a wave of migration from northwestern Amazonia, and we further show that the Guarani peoples of southern Brazil and Paraguay came from a separate migration but share a common ancestor. We also detected a subsequent migratory wave coming from Mesoamerica that may have influenced the formation of the southern Tupí groups (Guarani branch).

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            "Civilizations" is a stretch, but pre-colonial southern coastal Brazil was relatively dense in population numbers.

            The local tribes were farmers in late neolithic-tier regional states, not jungle dwelling hunter-gatherers like most people think they were.
            They were in an early urbanization process. If they weren't stopped by colonization they would eventually evolve into a proto-civilization in few generations.

            basically, waves of different migrations of different people.
            and your relationship with each other is not really as close as you make it seem.
            What this says is closer to the truth than your "agricultural peoples" in the process of "civilization", this is a larp that could only be learned at USP.
            :

            lots and lots of different tribes. The guaranis, the tupiniquins, the tamoios, the carijós, the goitacas, the aimorés. There were a lot of different tribes, but none of them developed writting, clothing nor agriculture. Thats why we dont hear much about them.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >this is a larp that could only be learned at USP
            Obsessed. No, I'm not from USP, dummy, I'm just a southerner who likes to read stuff about natives in my own land.
            The Guarani tribes were relatively well organized in comparison to Macro-Je people from the countryside.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            [...]
            basically, waves of different migrations of different people.
            and your relationship with each other is not really as close as you make it seem.
            What this says is closer to the truth than your "agricultural peoples" in the process of "civilization", this is a larp that could only be learned at USP.
            :[...]

            I'm also not even the same dude who posted all the comments you are malding about. I just posted this one

            "Civilizations" is a stretch, but pre-colonial southern coastal Brazil was relatively dense in population numbers.

            The local tribes were farmers in late neolithic-tier regional states, not jungle dwelling hunter-gatherers like most people think they were.
            They were in an early urbanization process. If they weren't stopped by colonization they would eventually evolve into a proto-civilization in few generations.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Não sou o cara, mas nah.
            Eles eram basicamente parecidos no sentido cultural e "organizacional".

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            [...]
            basically, waves of different migrations of different people.
            and your relationship with each other is not really as close as you make it seem.
            What this says is closer to the truth than your "agricultural peoples" in the process of "civilization", this is a larp that could only be learned at USP.
            :[...]

            "Civilizations" is a stretch, but pre-colonial southern coastal Brazil was relatively dense in population numbers.

            The local tribes were farmers in late neolithic-tier regional states, not jungle dwelling hunter-gatherers like most people think they were.
            They were in an early urbanization process. If they weren't stopped by colonization they would eventually evolve into a proto-civilization in few generations.

            and your point about them being "densely populated" is information I want to know exactly where you got it from.
            >In addition, we found genomic evidence of coastal population collapse, with an extreme bottleneck effect in the admixed Tupiniquim population.
            the Portuguese didn't say that, genetics doesn't say that, and their way of life doesn't match that

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            They aren't all from the same family. The map itself shows the difference between the fonts: the ones whose names are in italic font are members of other families, non-Tupi.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The Guarani were quite a populous indigenous group in the Rio de Plata basin that practiced agriculture. A redditor might call them a civilization to virtue signal, but they were not comparable to a civilization like the Incas.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      "Civilizations" is a stretch, but pre-colonial southern coastal Brazil was relatively dense in population numbers.

      The local tribes were farmers in late neolithic-tier regional states, not jungle dwelling hunter-gatherers like most people think they were.
      They were in an early urbanization process. If they weren't stopped by colonization they would eventually evolve into a proto-civilization in few generations.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      There were huge cities in the Amazon that produced fertile soil (terra preta) along the mayor rivers and build massive earthworks. Big platforms and causeways to get out of the floodwaters. probably around 1/5th of the amazon is not wild forest, but planted food forest with a much higher proportion of trees yielding food, medicine or materials for human use. They died off from diseases before many europeans made it there.
      Read up on Francisco de Orellana. He sailed down the amazon in the 1540s and had a friar with him that documented the journey and the massive populations they encountered. The account was mostly thought as being exaggerated, until logging and and lately ladar surveys uncovered more of the widespread earthworks.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        The Amazon north of what is being discussed you homie

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          that other anon asked about the americas. also theres some tributaries to the amazon that get pretty close to the trail in the OP. I would be surprised if it wasnt connected to the amazonian people as well.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      that's like assuming there was a great proto-Polish empire in antiquity because there was a trade route connecting Rome with Baltic amber.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    But..
    Who was here then?
    Who were they trading with?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      lots and lots of different tribes. The guaranis, the tupiniquins, the tamoios, the carijós, the goitacas, the aimorés. There were a lot of different tribes, but none of them developed writting, clothing nor agriculture. Thats why we dont hear much about them.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        The Carijós are also Guarani. "Carijó" just the ethnonym given by the Guaranis who lived next to the coast.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous
  6. 1 month ago
    ࿇ C Œ M G E N V S ࿇

    >[...] a good proportion of the trail was made by giant pre-historical animals[...]

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