good books about angry, pathetic loners?

good books about angry, pathetic loners?
i already the classics like read notes from the underground, the tunnel, and no longer human

Homeless People Are Sexy Shirt $21.68

DMT Has Friends For Me Shirt $21.68

Homeless People Are Sexy Shirt $21.68

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    A Posthumous Confession by Marcellus Emants is right up your alley. If you liked the Tunnel then try Omensetter's Luck, also by Gass; Jethro, the priest, is the character that would appeal to you, though the focus only moves onto him later in the novel; I'd highly recommend anyway. Death on the Instalment Plan and Journey to the End of the Night by Celine. Anything by Houellebecq. Nausea by Sartre. (Bear in mind you'll have to accept the French angry, pathetic loners having sex, but given you included No Longer Human in your list I'm assuming that's fine.) A Man Asleep by Perec if you don't mind swapping apathy for anger (again, No Longer Human says you'll be fine with it).

    And let's not forget my diary tbh.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I meant the Tunnel by Sabato not by Gass but both fit in either case

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    pretty much all of Kafka.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      dont think Kafka is really angry though

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    My diary tbh

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Also another classic but "Hunger" by Hamsun.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    These are also very much classics but "The Book of Diquiet" by Pessoa, Schopenhauer's essays, and "On the Heights of Despair" by Cioran are all that kind of read and also great writing.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I'd like to read one where the main character is genuinely sexless and unloved with no hope in sight
    so far I've yet to find any that fits the bills. there's always some woman the main character simps for or comes close to bedding down
    I can't relate to that, man..

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Incels are a very new phenomena

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Whatever by Houellebecq

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    my twisted world, the diary of a rapist, the maimed, and the temple of the golden pavillion. enjoy.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >actually reading my twisted world
      ngmi

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        elliot rodger was not a talented author but even so, my twisted world is a very interesting read.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I know even the craziest person in the world can make coherent sense every now and then. Elliot is an interesting case. He's obviously an immense narcissist with huge entitlement issues. he knows his mistakes but refuses to do anything about them rather wanting everyone to love him regardless if he's insufferable. I think he was especially upset because he was born in the perfect circumstances to "become" someone yet he was a fricking loser and he had nobody to genuinly blame but himself (aside from his absent father). He was a delusional idiot but he does offer some valuable insight to why incels are the way they are. they're awful people but the christian in me thinks we should help them rather than, perhaps rightfully, abuse them furthur and exasporate the problem.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    my book if I could publish it

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Take the Ignatiuspill

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >angry, pathetic loners
    wuthering heights unironically

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Eugene Onegin. I like the Spalding translation the best

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Mars by Fritz Zorn.

    >Mars is an autobiographical book by Fritz Angst (1944–1976) under the pseudonym Fritz Zorn. It was first published in 1977. Adolf Muschg wrote its long and engaged foreword. The book was reviewed in the book review section of The New York Times, which says that the author's pseudonym of "Fritz Zorn" literally means "Freddie Anger". In the book, written after the author was diagnosed with cancer, Zorn describes and criticizes his environment, entourage, and upbringing in one of the wealthiest lakeshore neighborhoods of Zurich, Switzerland, where he says he was "educated to death". Zorn laments his "unlived life": though he apparently became successful in the eyes of the bourgeoisie (he attended university and became a teacher), his whole life was "wrong". He suffered from depression and never had friends or a girlfriend.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Anything Weininger.

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    How would a modern psychology understand the underground man? How did he become this way, or was he fated to be from the moment he was born? Can he be fixed with meds?

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *