How did Tolkien aquire such a realistic sense of consequences?

When the Balrog and Gandalf get in a fight, it lasts for about 10 days!! 2 demi-gods battling to death, and it's such insanity. 10 days sounds exactly how long that would last. Even though in the common tongue it is an incomprehensibly long time for any one thing to go on.

When the Valar took down Morgoth they destroyed like half of Arda, which is again such a crazy idea but of course these ethereal powers do unfathomable damage to the lands of simple mortals.

But it just is so wild to even comprehend the idea of that, and he seems to consistently write his stories around it.
It's so cool, and i'm sure there are more examples, but how did he think of this. To have such absolute madness still resonate in a realistic form?

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  1. 12 months ago
    Anonymous

    >How did Tolkien acquire
    By stealing

  2. 12 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Valar took down Morgoth
    Sauron betrayed him though, didn’t he?

    • 12 months ago
      Anonymous

      xcuse me?
      what would sauron ''betraying'' any of the valar even mean to them?

      • 12 months ago
        Anonymous

        Betrayed Morgoth, his superior.

        >Sauron betrayed him though, didn’t he?
        I don’t think he does? Instead of killing him, the Valar tell him to go to Mandos and repent and he might just receive a pardon and he almost does but he ultimately doesn’t because of the humiliation.

        Different iteration of the Silmarillion I suppose.

        • 12 months ago
          Anonymous

          yeah, his superior. And not by a little
          a maiar isn't really a threat to valar i think..

    • 12 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Sauron betrayed him though, didn’t he?
      I don’t think he does? Instead of killing him, the Valar tell him to go to Mandos and repent and he might just receive a pardon and he almost does but he ultimately doesn’t because of the humiliation.

    • 12 months ago
      Anonymous

      xcuse me?
      what would sauron ''betraying'' any of the valar even mean to them?

      >Sauron betrayed him though, didn’t he?
      I don’t think he does? Instead of killing him, the Valar tell him to go to Mandos and repent and he might just receive a pardon and he almost does but he ultimately doesn’t because of the humiliation.

      Betrayed Morgoth, his superior.

      [...]
      Different iteration of the Silmarillion I suppose.

      • 12 months ago
        Anonymous

        Page(s) before this?

        • 12 months ago
          Anonymous

          It’s from the Fall of Numenor book that came out last year. It complies all of the lore Tolkien wrote on the matter

          • 12 months ago
            Anonymous

            So previous pages doesn’t have what I mentioned, or you just rather skip to the part you were thinking of?

            And i am just going by the Silmarillion

          • 12 months ago
            Anonymous
          • 12 months ago
            Anonymous

            So there’s nothing in there about the circumstances of their nabbing him and what Sauron’s part in it was?
            Don’t you have a copy of the Silmarillion?

          • 12 months ago
            Anonymous

            Sauron isn't mentioned in the section of the Silmarillion that covers the War of Wrath. His appearance in the Akallabeth doesn't mention what he did immediately after the end of the First Age aside from saying that he hid in Middle-earth and grew strong again. Unless you count Sauron feeling a brief moment of genuine regret and wanting to be forgiven by the Valar, he did not betray Morgoth.

          • 12 months ago
            Anonymous

            compiles?
            what do you mean because there are already 15 books about middle earth??

    • 12 months ago
      Anonymous

      No. Melkor was defeated twicez like Sauron was. First, the Valars, together, managed to send him back to Angband. Second, he was defeated in a great war, and was sent to basically non-existence, where the Valar lived with Iluvatar before Arda.

  3. 12 months ago
    Anonymous

    so I for one am wondering why gandalf didn't tell this
    '' There is no way out of that ravine.
    Th�oden is walking into a trap. He thinks
    he�s leading them to safety. What they
    will get is a massacre. Th�oden has
    a strong will but I fear for him. I
    fear for the survival of Rohan. He will
    need you before the end, Aragorn. The
    people of Rohan will need you. The defences
    HAVE to hold.

    ARAGORN
    They will hold.

    GANDALF
    [Turns to Shadowfax and strokes him]
    The Grey Pilgrim... that�s what they
    used to call me.''
    to Theoden instead of Aragorn and Legolas

  4. 12 months ago
    Anonymous

    Because some people just have a sense of that sort of thing, Anon.

    How did Dante have such a vivid imagination without the aid of psychadelics, and such inttense command of Italian poetic language?

    Some people are just geniuses and they can make things work.

  5. 12 months ago
    Anonymous

    there is also the 3 hunters running for days on end. It's basically unthinkable in the modern world

  6. 12 months ago
    Anonymous

    Tolkien was a Christian. His work is imbued with archetypal content that resonates with the soul.

  7. 12 months ago
    Anonymous

    I think you might be moronic OP.

    • 12 months ago
      Anonymous

      why

  8. 12 months ago
    Anonymous

    Horus and Seth fought for eighty years straight without stopping, in Egyptian myth. Tolkien literally just reformatted myths. And you're just an easily amused homosexual.

    • 12 months ago
      Anonymous

      well all the power to meeeeeeeeeeeee then
      have fun criticizing roman mythology or whatever

    • 12 months ago
      Anonymous

      80 years
      lmfao
      slightly bodacious don't you think

    • 12 months ago
      Anonymous

      >fought for eighty years straight

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