i often see in translations of russian books a phrase like:

i often see in translations of russian books a phrase like:
>"suppose we are on A street and want to get to B street."
i understand that this is a russian convention when posing a hypothetical and that these streets to not actually exist but i find it annoying that the translators never seem to convert it to the very common and analogous english convention that would read:
>"suppose we are on street A and want to get to street B."
are there any translators that write it this way?

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Yes P&V do in their translation of Anna Karenina but not in their other translations. What you’re looking for is called idiomatic translation

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Is it A and B tho? Or is it just the first letter of the street? In English you would Baker Street or Washington Boulevard, no?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >is it just the first letter of the street?
      no becuase the characters i'm describing are not talking about real streets that exist within the contexts of their stories.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    NTA but I've got a gripe too, in some translations of Dostovesky's work it'll completely omit the name of a bridge or street. As in
    >he walked up ____ prospect
    Why is this a thing? I'm aware some translations go out of their way to trace the footsteps of the characters in the novel but wtf is the deal with this?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      i think they wanted to aim towards a faithful translation (which is a selling point) since the author had done that in the original version
      footnotes would tell you the full name, they just wanted to emulate the original through the main text

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        …huh? Why not just transliterate the name?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Oh you mean Dosto wrote it as K____ bridge or whatever in the original text? If so, why did he do that?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Yes

          B нaчaлe июля, в чpeзвычaйнo жapкoe вpeмя, пoд вeчep, oдин мoлoдoй чeлoвeк вышeл из cвoeй кaмopки, кoтopyю нaнимaл oт жильцoв в **C—м** пepeyлкe, нa yлицy и мeдлeннo, кaк бы в нepeшимocти, oтпpaвилcя к **К—нy** мocтy.

          It was a way to steal the general form of a real place without constraining the story to its every particularity, so K--- Bridge as the elided form of Katherine Bridge refers not to the real-world Katherine Bridge as such, but a fictional location with analogous qualities; a simulation of the real place, to serve the purpose of the novel. In this way an author protects his story from the reader's pedantry like: "Oh, well it's not *exactly* like that in reality, this is stupid!"

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Makes sense. But were readers back in the day genuienly moronic or something? Did they not understand the concept of creative liberty?
            This is why Celine is the real chad. He just intentionally wrote incorrect geographic/historic details just to make readers seethe.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            I thought he removed them because autistic book tourists were shitting up all the locations by being weirdos.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >C—m
            >C—ny
            heh

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Makes sense. But were readers back in the day genuienly moronic or something? Did they not understand the concept of creative liberty?
            This is why Celine is the real chad. He just intentionally wrote incorrect geographic/historic details just to make readers seethe.

            when i write in my diary i try to avoid specific loacations and i always explain contemporay tech or media as if the reader is unfamiliar with them so that if someone reads it someday it won't feel out of place/date but like like something that could have been written by someone living in their time. maybe dosto had a similiar mindset.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >if someone reads it someday

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            it's easier to write when you imagine an audience. it helps you choose a tone among other things.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      This also drives me nuts and I would like to know why

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      It's because of censorships

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Generally British translators will do it the first way and American the second because that is how they do such things in their country. Exception being translations which are going for accuracy over style.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      B-but Wall Street

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Let's go for a walk on Johnson's street.
    makes more sense than
    >Let's go for a walk on street Johnson.
    the situation is due to most streets being named after someone

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