>i should have never been born. >lives to 84

>i should have never been born
>lives to 84
get a load of this fricking guy

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >I LOVE LIF-ACCK

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      if you're going to live it you may as well love it

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Did you expect him to off himself? If so, why? Curious to see your reasoning, or absence of reasoning.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      i have no reasoning
      i'm just bored and A Short History of Decay arrived today

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >i'm just bored
        Then read a book instead

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          no i want to post sardonically on IQfy for attention

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >If so, why?
      It's a shirking of responsibility, even over oneself- a false one, because the ability remains- to arrive at some significant conclusion, and then live as if nothing happened.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >life bad
        >therefore death good
        Non sequitur.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Non sequitur
          Plebbitard’s first babby ~~*logical fallacy*~~

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous
        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Cioran absolutely exalted nothingness, which he opposed to life lol

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Are you assuming death = nothingness here? How do you know?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            It's irrelevant. It only makes it worse. Of course, the ultimate aim is unachievable, so one is totally excused from anything and everything.

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I didn't realize the guy from Eraserhead was an author.

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It do be like that sometimes

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I loved him in Eraserhead!

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    has literally nobody here even read cioran

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I've read (in translation) all his main stuff from the French period, and the two available Romanian books. Made a project of it starting about 18 months ago.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        What’s your favourite?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Probably A Short History of Decay (his French debut), it's the one in the bunch that I'm seriously considering re-reading at some point. Also Trouble with Being Born is a bit over-rated on account of the marketable title (Barnes and Noble are literally stocking it on the shelves now purely because of us).

          It's the one he poured his little black heart and soul into. He rewrote it multiple times and wanted to make sure it was absolutely perfect before he would allow it to be published. His plan worked. The frogs liked it right way, he actually accepted the prize they gave him (he usually didn't do that), and it established his reputation. The rest, he just does his usual thing of whining about life.

          A personal favorite essay is Odyssy of Rancor (which is a sustained, withering screed which can be summed up as follows: hatred is stronger than love, it made such an impression on me that I re-read it almost immediately), but the other surrounding stuff in History and Utopia isn't his top-drawer stuff. Anathemas and Admirations (a mash-up of his last two books) also has above-average aphorisms and, usefully, his personal reflections on various French literary figures.

          Reading him chronologically was an interesting project. When you pay attention you see how he repeats himself a lot. In the 60s-70s he actually seems to get angrier for a time and has teenage-tier edgy lines about fantasizing about killing people/caving random people's heads in, opposite to what usually happens with old men who mellow out as their T goes down.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Interesting , I’ll read a short history of decay next I think. He said on the heights of despair had no style and was a poor book. Funnily enough I prefer it to the trouble with being born so far. Wonder why he accepted the prize for that one

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Heights of Despair is perfectly fine and actually quite good for something written in one's early 20s, he just has an older man's disdain for what his younger self put out. A piece that I like from that one is his bewilderment at how everyone keeps busy and manages to do normal things. He then fantasizes that everyone just stops what they're doing, everyone just empties out onto the streets, stares blankly into the sky and some big maelstrom sweeps everything away.

            The major theme in that one is to catalogue negative emotions and distinguish them from each other: differences between sadness and melancholy, momentary pain doesn't count as suffering because the only true suffering is long-lasting, etc,

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Yeah i like heights of despair a lot. Does repeat himself in some aspects but as you said 22 when he wrote it.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    God had to give him enough time to change his mind

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I didn't realize the lindyman replyguy was an author

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I only like his aphorisms.

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What was the context behind the ‘Don’t tell anyone I actually love life’ quote.

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >"Every day is a Rubicon I want to drown myself in"

    He's fricking funny tbh

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      He is im convinced he’s just at it

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >write a book called no kids
    >has two kids

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      why are israelites like this bros

      she literally wrote an anti-work book called hello laziness while being a multimillionaire bestselling author herself.

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