I tried listening to this for the first time. I'd read a bit of philosophy but not much.

I tried listening to this for the first time. I'd read a bit of philosophy but not much.
I don't know if I caught even a single word of it.
The introduction said for Hegel, we know what he's talking about even though we can barely understand his sentences, but with Nitschze, we understand his sentences even though we have no idea what he's talking about.
Should I listen to Nitschze next?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You should not have picked one of the most difficult philosophers to read/listen to without a stronger philosophical backing.
    There's a reason why there are other people's analysis of Hegel right next to his actual writing.
    In general philosophers will rely, cite, quote and even use proofs of philosophers who came before them. Historicity is important.
    So, unironically, start with the Greeks

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >start with the greeks
      Not OP, but disagree. Most philosophers are responding to the landscape as it is in their time. You should understand the philosophical problems that they were attempting to solve, not attempt to know every philosopher who remotely influenced them. If OP really doesn't know much about philosophy, he should read an introduction (NOT a history) like https://www.google.com/books/edition/The_Problems_of_Philosophy/HuPGLTYv5wUC?hl=en&gbpv=1&dq=problems+of+philosophy&printsec=frontcover. Then read some Plato or Aristotle, the English Empiricists or the rationalists, and then Kant. That should be more than enough to understand the arguments contained.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Philosophers are all idiots.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          And the good ones are wise enough to know it, too.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            True.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Hegel on audiobook is a bit egregious. I'm also quite convinced the difficulties in understanding him are compounded by the translators, although I've only read the preface in German so far. But philosophy needs to be read and re-read on the page, and this one is so difficult that it maybe even needs paraphrasing in your own words after each proposition like you're translating a text. Audiobooks are much better for (most) novels. And yes as other anon says read more philosophy before tackling Hegel again. You don't necessarily need the whole philosophical canon as other anons will claim but Kant is absolutely required context.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Watch this, a talk with the only person I have ever heard of who actually read the whole thing...

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Phenomenology of Spirit in audiobook form.
    good fricking luck lmao (sorry if ur blind or something tho)

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Read this entire guide before reading Hegel.
    >but but I wanna read him now
    You'll get so much more out of his works if you understand where he's coming from and why he's attempting his project.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      What about the works between Fichte and Hegel?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        The list in

        If you’re getting into Hegel, do NOT start with Phenomenology of Spirit. Start with his Jena writings assuming you’ve read all the prior philosophers.

        https://righthegelian.com/reading-list/

        is honestly pretty good in that department. Lots of very interesting stuff there imo, especially if you speak German.

        Here's Hegel in a nutshell
        >history leads toward something by design because of ghost magic
        >it works by taking one thing and putting it another thing thats different and they fight until they finally give up and frick and produce a rapebaby
        >when this all ends it will end in NOTHING LMAO LOLOLOL NOTHING b***h THATS RIGHT. HAHAHAHA
        Saved you a lot of time

        Why even bother posting in this thread if you don't understand the subject material?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Where am I wrong

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Alternative to this maximalism, you can start with Hegel provided you go from
      >the Philosophy Lectures,
      >Introduction section of the Phenomenology
      >History Lectures,
      >to Aesthetics Lectures, then the Encylopedia [reverse order],
      >then The Philosopher of Religion Lectures (critical and the real start of the summit),
      of Right [because we now understand the conditions for Objective Freedom]
      >then the Greater Logic and finally the Phenomenology of Spirit.

      A primer on the terminology/jargon helps, as well as having in mind the general structure/terms of Neoplatonism(s) for anagogic comparison (One, Emanation, Apeiron, Indefinite Dyad, ect). Hegel despite the subject is quite a lucid thinker and writer, but frequently degraded by the lack of facility of his more recent translators [turn of the 20th century renderings are largely quite adequate thanks to the Cambridge Idealists].

      For the Philosophy of Religion lectures find the Hodgeson edition, it's the absolute definitive English edition with segregated manuscript variation footnotes.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Here's Hegel in a nutshell
    >history leads toward something by design because of ghost magic
    >it works by taking one thing and putting it another thing thats different and they fight until they finally give up and frick and produce a rapebaby
    >when this all ends it will end in NOTHING LMAO LOLOLOL NOTHING b***h THATS RIGHT. HAHAHAHA
    Saved you a lot of time

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    If you’re getting into Hegel, do NOT start with Phenomenology of Spirit. Start with his Jena writings assuming you’ve read all the prior philosophers.

    https://righthegelian.com/reading-list/

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >dense philosophy audiobook
    lmao

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      surefire way of dying on the highway

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    he is difficult, i tried too but i stopped and listen to some of his easier books.

    anyway i was interested only in one chapter that i found it in something related in other book

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      i am not really interested in his system or philosophy, i just want to know what a scholar at his rank thinks about some particular subjects, at that period in history

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