Irish

Hello everyone I am going to ireland for a great program of book discussion. Please tell me, what books or poems should I read to aquaint myself with the Irish style of writing and the irish attitude in general? Is Joyce a good introduction? Portrait of dorian grey? Please let me know.

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Read Yeats and start believing in faries.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Will I see faries during my time in Eire

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Will I see faries during my time in Eire
        I hope so.
        Fair fairies and green nymphs.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I'm not really bent out of shape about it. It's all really just very complicated. We've got a lot of really beaten down people, who basically just got fricked by the system to the point of just being dead inside. It's really fricking depressing, especially because they tend to stick to the status quo, so whatever the latest $IDEA is, that's their mode of thinking. It's not exclusive to Ireland nor is it the only idea, it's just it really depends on where you're at. Like Dublin? Absolute shithole, avoid at all costs, but there are plenty of nicer places. I always love the Gaeltachts, but you'd have to actually know the language, so just kinda stay away from there. In the anglosphere, my little experience of NI is a mixed bag, plenty of really burnt out guys that are really nice when they're finally mellowed out from work, but Donegal is still pretty great and people are like a perfect mixture of kind and leaving you the frick alone to do your own thing.
      I'd suggest trying to read the cycles. Stick to pre-1950's renditions of the cycles though. Lady Augusta Gregory is very influencial, despite taking quite a bit of liberties. Oscar Wilde is obviously a good idea. Check out Eilís Dillon, Liam Mac Uistín, Padraic Colum.
      Joyce is great, but just read the Dubliners first. That's what most people will have read, if anything. I know, Ulysses and all that. I have all of his works, plus the study shit to go with it. But that's a very specific niche, and you'll find mostly irish-americans are into it.
      Caoimhin De Barra's Gaeilge: A Radical Revolution will give you an idea of the language and general feelings of it.
      Oh, check out The Tain. (That's part of the cycles) people generally agree Kinsella's translation is pretty great.
      Oh and read up on Patrick Pearse's murder machine. If you're older, read up on Peg and complain a little. Or don't. Peg isn't even that bad.
      Anyways, that's all I have. It's late and I have shit to do. Oh, but real quick. An outsider might find Dublin interesting. Now, I'm not from Dublin, but it's a depressing hellscape when you see your people in that state. You ever been to downtown Austin, Texas or look at mid/south California's streets? Same shit, different dialect.

      >http://IQfylit.wikia.com/wiki/Recommended_Reading
      there's a chart or two filed under charts by country

      >all recs a hundred years old
      As is the custom.
      For something a bit more contemporary, try Colm Toibin, Sinead Morrissey, Paul Muldoon, William Trevor, Michael Longley, John McGahern, Derek Mahon or John Banville

      What is your opinion on the state of the Irish people now? You used to be great poets, writers, artist, painters and magic people. Not to mention greatly religious. But it feels like if you have lost all your identity.

      >You used to be great poets, writers, artist, painters and magic people. Not to mention greatly religious. But it feels like if you have lost all your identity.
      what trying to catch Belfast does to a micky.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Bring an umbrella

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >aquaint myself with the Irish style of writing
    A long time ago, and a very good one at that, bla bla bla.
    >the irish attitude in general
    Too complicated. The most common sentiments are what some people may call "anti-semitism", love freedom (simple as), and the non-deracinated love the Irish race and Ireland.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >the irish attitude is… love of the irish
      Wow thanks for this incredible observation I could not tell

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Tell me things, but read my mind on what I may or may not already know
        feminine

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          But I asked for reccomendations on texts to read. That was very specific. Was just kidding around though dont worry about it anon

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I'm not really bent out of shape about it. It's all really just very complicated. We've got a lot of really beaten down people, who basically just got fricked by the system to the point of just being dead inside. It's really fricking depressing, especially because they tend to stick to the status quo, so whatever the latest $IDEA is, that's their mode of thinking. It's not exclusive to Ireland nor is it the only idea, it's just it really depends on where you're at. Like Dublin? Absolute shithole, avoid at all costs, but there are plenty of nicer places. I always love the Gaeltachts, but you'd have to actually know the language, so just kinda stay away from there. In the anglosphere, my little experience of NI is a mixed bag, plenty of really burnt out guys that are really nice when they're finally mellowed out from work, but Donegal is still pretty great and people are like a perfect mixture of kind and leaving you the frick alone to do your own thing.
            I'd suggest trying to read the cycles. Stick to pre-1950's renditions of the cycles though. Lady Augusta Gregory is very influencial, despite taking quite a bit of liberties. Oscar Wilde is obviously a good idea. Check out Eilís Dillon, Liam Mac Uistín, Padraic Colum.
            Joyce is great, but just read the Dubliners first. That's what most people will have read, if anything. I know, Ulysses and all that. I have all of his works, plus the study shit to go with it. But that's a very specific niche, and you'll find mostly irish-americans are into it.
            Caoimhin De Barra's Gaeilge: A Radical Revolution will give you an idea of the language and general feelings of it.
            Oh, check out The Tain. (That's part of the cycles) people generally agree Kinsella's translation is pretty great.
            Oh and read up on Patrick Pearse's murder machine. If you're older, read up on Peg and complain a little. Or don't. Peg isn't even that bad.
            Anyways, that's all I have. It's late and I have shit to do. Oh, but real quick. An outsider might find Dublin interesting. Now, I'm not from Dublin, but it's a depressing hellscape when you see your people in that state. You ever been to downtown Austin, Texas or look at mid/south California's streets? Same shit, different dialect.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            What is your opinion on the state of the Irish people now? You used to be great poets, writers, artist, painters and magic people. Not to mention greatly religious. But it feels like if you have lost all your identity.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >You used to be great poets, writers, artist, painters and magic people. Not to mention greatly religious. But it feels like if you have lost all your identity.
            what trying to catch Belfast does to a micky.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            In history, there has always been an ebb and flow. We have always seen greatness come back during conflict, and the entire world is in a major conflict. From economic and social problems to mass disillusionment with the liberal worldview that has been so dominant for so long up to actual warfare.
            I'm sure positive things are around the corner.. and I don't say that as some kind of blind optimism. Right now, yeah, things suck. But we've had another revival drumming up over the last few years. The interest in the language, itself, has been overwhelmingly great all while in-group preference continues to rise back upwards. Hell, we've even seen a lot more Irish actors gaining popularity. I didn't really expect that one. All we're missing is a handful of writers that lean nationalist and all this bad will finally start to wash away.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            What is your opinion on the state of the Irish people now? You used to be great poets, writers, artist, painters and magic people. Not to mention greatly religious. But it feels like if you have lost all your identity.

            If there's anything Ireland needs, it's more sectarianism and maudlin nostalgia

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous
    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I like it. Nice

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Might like some Patrick Kavannagh poetry if you lean towards the rustic side of things. His novel Tarry Flynn is very good as well.

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >http://IQfylit.wikia.com/wiki/Recommended_Reading
    there's a chart or two filed under charts by country

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >all recs a hundred years old
    As is the custom.
    For something a bit more contemporary, try Colm Toibin, Sinead Morrissey, Paul Muldoon, William Trevor, Michael Longley, John McGahern, Derek Mahon or John Banville

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The Turner Diaries

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Irish IQfy
    No thanks

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Guys I'd like to have a vacation home on the west Coast of Ireland. Cringe or based? County mayo probably but open to others

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Why is Irish folklore so comfy bros?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Dylan

      Irish have more soul than most countries

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The ethereal-yet-human quality, gods simply wandering the landscape yet they feel more human than the Greek or Norse gods.

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