Is it enough to keep local law enforcement out?

Is it enough to keep local law enforcement out?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    yes of course

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    lol no, better use GNU/Linux with LUKS or a third party option. Sadly, it is required to be activated on business.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      What is your threat model? To answer "is it enough" in most cases yes.
      Otherwise:

      >LUKS(1 or 2)

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    No. And also, it is bound to your TPM. And also, the key is stored in Microsoft's cloud. So go figure. It's a terrible solution.
    Bitlocker is just a placebo for blebs so they won't kill their cheating wives right off the bat

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >The key is stored in Microsoft cloud
      If you're using a local account it isn't.

      its windows. absolute guarantee the CIA, FBI, and NSA have backdoor keys into it.

      The NSA backdoored the proprietary firmware on your Linux machine you moron

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >windows bootlicker comes in to slobber all over microdick OS

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Literally none of this is true.
      It is great to see BitLocker is still making loontroons cope and seethe after 17 years.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        see

        >Is it enough to keep local law enforcement out?
        No, they have a USB dongle that uses JTAG to pull keys from the hardware and bypass paswords. Works on phones too.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous
    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      if bitlocker truly worked, the government would be flipping their shit warning about it and trying to get it banned.
      they don't whine about bitlocker. they whine about luks and other forms of encryption. but they never whine about bitlocker, period.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >proprietary
    local law enforcement is already in

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    its windows. absolute guarantee the CIA, FBI, and NSA have backdoor keys into it.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    it'll keep you out too,

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Stop breaking the law.
    Be moral.
    Setup a hardware firewall.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    it won’t be the local pigs coming for your cheese homosexual

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    it will keep local thugs from penetrating your data
    but the good guys will of course have access (as they should)

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Local account, fTPM, non automountable, non system drive.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I dunno.
    what are the odds you have much more incriminating stuff that isn't encrypted?

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It depends on what you mean by "out".
    >out of your computer
    Maybe, but probably not. Depends on where you are and what you did.
    >out of your anus
    LOL no.

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous
  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Local law enforcement
    Typically the county police aren't looking at your computer, unless you did something gravely stupid.

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >local law enforcement
    As in your town? Sure. There's actually 0 here in a 100 mile radius. But we're just a small 40K people village. The govt. Decided to defund them since only a couple shootings a year doesen't warrant a police station upkeep.

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    have you tried not downloading child porn

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >goylocker

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Yes. Would recommend backing up the bitlocker key on a flash drive/sd card that you do not use frequently and storing it safely (perhabs not in your house). You can safely ignore freetards seething ITT since as long as you are not chased by NSA/Mossad/whatever, bitlocker will be fine. Keep in mind that 3rd party solutions like Vecracrypt, Disk Cryptor etc. are very likely to irreversively brick your windows installation during an update, so avoid that.

  19. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Not in Australia - we don't have a constitutional prohibition on being forced to incriminate yourself so its a criminal offence here not to provide police with your passwords and passcodes. No amount of encryption protects you in the land down under. Most CP weirdo's end up in jail here eventually

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Most CP weirdo's end up in jail here eventually
      Happened to the owner of 12chan on the Gold Coast. That place was maybe a little too obvious.

  20. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It can't keep even the local tinkertroony out lmoa

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Yet again, you Dunning-Krugered yourself into posting this. Stacksmashing himeself literally admited that it wont work with TPM pin enabled and the laptop in question also has to have exposed spi pins. Meds.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      If law enforcement is breaking down your door already to get to your PC/Laptop they have enough dirt on you from ISP logs or monitoring that it's really not a question if buttlicker will save you from jail.

      This was patched in most firmware and requires a specific use case setup that is so utterly moronic you might as well not have bootlocker set up if it's all wrong

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Is it enough to keep local law enforcement out?
      No, they have a USB dongle that uses JTAG to pull keys from the hardware and bypass paswords. Works on phones too.

      see
      [...]

      >look mom i got ChatGPT to make up some words about bitlocker to own the wingays
      >ps can i have something better than my c2d for christmas 2026 plz
      >reeeeee mommy they're not believing my bullshit sue them for cyberbullying reeeeeeeee
      Imagine being this absolute failure. Ask me how I know your skin's melanin content.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Is your department too poor to get one?

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Unfortunately, buying stupid hairless monkeys like you was outlawed in my country a couple of centuries ago.
          It's a shame, because we went in for full chattel slavery, with literally zero rights for animals like you.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            wat?

  21. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Is it enough to keep local law enforcement out?
    No, they have a USB dongle that uses JTAG to pull keys from the hardware and bypass paswords. Works on phones too.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Post Proof or BTFO

  22. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Do you seriously think that there's any form of encryption that hasnt been compromised by glowies? Face it, if they want in they'll get in.

  23. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    no, as m$ gets the key. the only benefit of bitlocker is that it can use the TPM, but honestly who cares
    use veracrypt on windows, LUKS on linux. simple as, both are piss easy to use

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      and know that LUKS/LUKS2 provides all the information required to brute force the disk. It's fine for the USB OS volume but not OK for sensitive information. dm-crpypt plain using non default cipher, hash, mode and a random 250 to 450 character passphrase is a step up, no headers, just noise as far as forensics software is concerned. There are farms used today by orgs to decrypt LUKS, not cheap but it's paid for using your taxes.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >billions of years
        I'm sure it's worth the energy bill.

  24. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Considering how for years it was possible to bypass bitlocker using the Windows recovery partition I highly doubt it.

  25. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    An unencrypted recovery key is always uploaded to your microsoft account

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It is literally not. This is literally lie. You can backup your key locally to external drive.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        You're talking to "people" who can't even disable the MS Account "requirement" despite it being about five keypresses. Correcting their braindamage is like trying to explain quantum physics to a COVID-19 virus.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        You're talking to "people" who can't even disable the MS Account "requirement" despite it being about five keypresses. Correcting their braindamage is like trying to explain quantum physics to a COVID-19 virus.

        No in my comptia S+ class we had to login to our onedrive accounts to activate it and stuff

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          OneDrive and MS accounts are two different things. Try again, anon.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        What's more, it's not actually the encryption key that's backed up to your MS account in the default, moron-proof configuration - it's the recovery key. Y'know, the thing you've been freely able to change (or even delete entirely - though you're fricked if BitLocker Recovery ever comes a-knockin') with manage-bde for nearly 20 years.
        But as I said, we're talking about barely-conscious animals here who just regurgitate whatever clickbait appears on r/AyyTroonix or Youtube curated slop.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      No it's not moron it literally just has that as the default option, do zoomies seriously not know "save to file" and then select a usb drive?

      The only thing it won't let you do is save it to the local drive you intend to encrypt

  26. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Closed Source and Backdoors:
    BitLocker is closed-source, meaning its code is not publicly available for scrutiny. This opacity raises concerns about potential backdoors.
    Microsoft has been confirmed to cooperate with the NSA, and there have been instances of backdoors in other Microsoft products (e.g., Skype) 1.
    While this isn’t outright proof that BitLocker is untrustworthy, it does create reasonable doubt.
    The lack of documented cases where BitLocker resisted court orders (unlike TrueCrypt) adds to this skepticism 1.

    DoD Trust and Adversaries:
    The US Department of Defense (DoD) uses BitLocker on their field-deployed workstations. However, their adversary isn’t the NSA.
    BitLocker remains secure as long as your adversary isn’t a powerful entity like the NSA or law enforcement 1.
    Defending against petty theft is well within BitLocker’s capabilities.

    Risk Assessment:
    The NSA’s potential request for backdoors poses risks. If discovered by other foreign intelligence agencies, it could compromise national security 1.
    While we can’t personally audit either BitLocker or TrueCrypt, the DoD’s trust in BitLocker lends some credence to its safety 1.

    In summary, the debate continues, but the DoD’s usage suggests that BitLocker is a safe encryption option for specific contexts. However, always consider your threat model and choose accordingly.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      microsoft's own AI calls into question bitlocker lol

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