Is this shit worth learning?

What are some cool things I'll be able to do after I learn about compilers?

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    John Blow and Casey Muratori take a massive shit on this book.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The install gentoo wiki recommends it: https://wiki.installgentoo.com/wiki/Programming_resources

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The install gentoo wiki hasn't had a single contribution by a non-moron for at least 4 years.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Rightfully so. 90% of that book is about parsing source code. I import "nom" library and made parsing triviad

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >I import "nom" library
        Get out.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The install gentoo wiki recommends it: https://wiki.installgentoo.com/wiki/Programming_resources

      Rightfully so. 90% of that book is about parsing source code. I import "nom" library and made parsing triviad

      >I import "nom" library
      Get out.

      well

      None of you actually answered what I asked. I asked what will I be able to do after I learn about compilers? Why should I program my own compilers?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        i mean i personally started learning to
        - see if i can make existing compilers more performant and safe
        - make my own memelang
        - understand better how code works under the hood
        - understand how to make any code faster aligning it with how the compiler is made
        - it's honestly just a good way to learn low level programming, which is in line with other projects i wanna get involved in

        bumping bc i wanna see what other people say and how off track i am

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Oh, you can't "do" anything. Everything that matters is already a solved problem worked out by somebody smarter than you 20+ years ago. Learning this stuff is purely for hobbyist use and to win nerdfights online by knowing 5% more about some ridiculously niche topic than the other guy.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          play chess with me

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            If you posted a lichess link I would have but you didn't. Sorry about your luck, formerly chuck's.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            https://lichess.org/bcxpCwSe

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            you won
            i missed a move

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          or you could pay for a computer science masters and phd and become one of those smart guys from 20+ years ago.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >just get a phd bro
            That is a fine approach but outside of the scope of OP's question

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >become one
            deluded zoomer

            John Blow and Casey Muratori take a massive shit on this book.

            2 twatter Black folk who gives a shit opinion literally discarded

            Oh, you can't "do" anything. Everything that matters is already a solved problem worked out by somebody smarter than you 20+ years ago. Learning this stuff is purely for hobbyist use and to win nerdfights online by knowing 5% more about some ridiculously niche topic than the other guy.

            >is already a solved problem
            this is how a fegget moron think.
            not everyone are potentialess pathetic Black person shitheads like you

            [...]
            [...]
            [...]
            [...]
            None of you actually answered what I asked. I asked what will I be able to do after I learn about compilers? Why should I program my own compilers?

            >what will I be able to do
            what will you be able to do if you study mechanical engineering or anything else for that matter?
            this question stems from ignorance and stupidity, if you are interested in the conversion of syntax commands to binary chains then learn it, there is nothing beyond that

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Anon, I work with LLVM for a living and even I can’t give you a good answer beyond "because you’re interested in it"

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >even I
          a literal who? wow!

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Made you respond 🙂

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It can be useful for writing interpreters for domain-specific languages since a good interpreter is basically a program that compiles instructions for its own virtual machine. An example would be a query language for a data source that doesn't have a query engine yet.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        become a memelang chad

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Why?
      Have they expressed their opinions on israeliteTube?
      If so, link them. I'm off to bed in while and want to listen to these individuals drone on about shit no fricker cares about.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It came up in this talk about implementing a precedence parser
        It's actually a very good talk
        the thesis of the talk is that he has the most intuitive explanation of how to write a precedence parser and he gives a bunch of examples of how other people do a terrible job explaining the topic with a particularly harsh critique of the dragon book

        he holds up the book around the 18 minute mark

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >most STEMcucks are bad teachers
          that's because most of them are autists

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Clearly never read the book. Only 1/3 of it is dedicated up to parsing. There are more modern books however and I think a lot of the dragon book analyzes things that you'd encounter while writing a compiler and solve them intuitively so not worth reading in a book

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          this book is one of few rare places where it is explain how to make a LR(1) and an LALR(1) parser another place is Modern Compiler Implementation in ML by Andrew Appel

          I've watched this video and I've got a lot of experience writing various variations of operator precedence parsers specifically and no, his method is far from the best. In fact it's not even an operator precedence parser per se nor that he says that it is, but it's a method for dealing with operator precedence. What he does is use a recursive descent parser fot the entire language, operators are parsed with an equal precedence and a default associativity, and then, while or after the parse tree is produced, he changes the shape of the tree based of a precedence table.

          It would be better logically speaking to have the recursive descent parser simply call a proper operator prececedence parser and to choose the best variation of this algorithm because the original variants are hard to generalize beyond infix operators.. It's a lot easier to understand that rewriting the tree. Usual tree rewritings are not hard but when it's for modifying the precedence and associativity it's harder. His method also requires to store in the tree the information that a given AST node corresponds to an expressions surounded by parentheses.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Interesting. I thought that for precedence and associativity they just refactored the grammar automatically somehow before parsing normaly

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            checked
            >I thought that for precedence and associativity they just refactored the grammar automatically somehow before parsing normaly.
            No, that's technically possible but this implies metaprogramming and that the parser would be generated but Jai's parser is written manually like the 99% of recursive descent parsers.
            But putting an operator precedence parser inside a recursive descent parser or doing the ugly thing Blow is doing reduces a good deal the size of the code you need to write, because you need 1 function be precedence level (C has 15 of them) which is a few hundred if not more of repetitive code that you don't need to write anymore and it's more reliable, more easily verifiable.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            *1 function per precedence level

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    well

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    anyone https://lichess.org/cA3kEJlu

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      time to fire up my chess engine

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Played it, I was the anon who told chuck he should have posted a link in the first place. Missed the first link
      >99% accuracy, 7ACPL
      You probably think I cheated after that game unfortunately

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Nah I'd use python, frick your compilers

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I don't know felt like a roundabout way to learn compiling so I dropped it.

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    damn the old spyro graphics looked so different back then, sad what happened to the art guy

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    >Alfred Aho
    >asiatic
    he's a white man, of Finnish origin I think

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