It has never been more prescient. He must have had a time machine or something.

It has never been more prescient. He must have had a time machine or something.

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Pseudo reading

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    okay so sum it up in a sentence or two

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      what doth life

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous
    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Read the book

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I been reading his essays on the gulf war, every page is a banger.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    A future classic.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    It came out in 1981 man it's not that long ago. They didn't need time machines to see what was already happening.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    BAUDRILLARD BROS WE RISE!

    Was reading op at the bar a few days ago, still need to read his other works. Is he compatible with deleuze? I know the latter is more of a lefty but reading difference and repetition I can’t help but see a parallel. What about Sartre? I mean this is kinda neomodernist existentialism

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Discount Debord

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Debord was a suicidal loser

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Nope. just a Frenchman doing what Frenchmen do.

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Ah yes, a tenured professors thoughts, someone who is paid to sit there and publish books of utter bullshit all day, whose income depends on being provocative and saying something new. Ah, society is so fake, so vapid! Oh these fashion trends are so meaningless! Look at the plebs listening to their empty pop music! I'm so above all of that

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Central Idea: Our world is increasingly dominated by simulacra and simulations, which are copies, representations, or signs that have become detached from any original reality. These simulations come to define our experience, blurring the lines between the real and the artificial.

    Key Concepts:

    Simulacra: Copies or representations that lack an original. They are not simply copies, but become self-contained realities in themselves (e.g., Disneyland as a hyperreal version of happiness).
    Simulation: The process of creating simulations. As simulations become more sophisticated, they can appear more real than reality itself (e.g., virtual reality experiences).
    Hyperreality: A simulated reality that is so convincing, it becomes indistinguishable from "real" experience (e.g., the news media creating a specific narrative about an event).
    The Precession of Simulacra: The idea that simulations now precede and even shape reality. The map becomes more important than the territory (e.g., media portrayals of war influencing public perception).
    Consequences:

    Loss of a sense of the "real": As simulations become dominant, it becomes difficult to distinguish between authentic experience and simulated experience.
    Erosion of meaning: When signs and symbols are no longer tied to any underlying reality, they lose their meaning and become arbitrary.
    Rise of cynicism and apathy: In a world dominated by simulations, people become distrustful of everything and lose a sense of agency.

    Eerily Prescient?
    1. The Rise of Social Media and Influencers:

    Hyperreality of Curated Lives: Social media platforms like Instagram showcase a carefully curated version of reality. People project an idealized image, filled with filters and staged scenarios, creating a "hyperreality" that's far from authentic experience.

    Influencer Culture: Influencers build careers based on manufactured personas and sponsored content. What viewers see is often a meticulously crafted simulacrum, blurring the lines between genuine recommendation and advertising.

    2. The Spread of "Fake News" and Disinformation:

    Precession of Simulacra in Action: Social media allows fabricated stories to spread faster than the truth. Deepfakes and manipulated videos further blur the lines between real and unreal. The fabricated simulacrum becomes the perceived reality for many.

    Erosion of Trust: The constant barrage of misinformation makes it difficult to discern truth from fiction.

    These are just a few examples of how Baudrillard's ideas resonate in today's world. As technology continues to advance, the lines between real and simulated experiences will likely continue to blur. Simulacra and Simulation serves as a cautionary tale, urging us to remain critically aware of the constructed realities that surround us and fight to preserve a sense of the authentic in a world increasingly dominated by simulations.

    Source: https://warosu.org/lit/thread/S23287502

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      So simulacra are just signs that are elevated to memes as they become more successful. First we had shapes and sounds then we had numbers, then we developed language and math, then we used that to assign meaning and create little copies of our own world. I take offense at his prescriptive sense of metaphysics and how ignorant he is of this process. There's really nothing we can do against this since its natural.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I'm a brainlet so I have to ask.
      >Copies or representations that lack an original. They are not simply copies, but become self-contained realities in themselves (e.g., Disneyland as a hyperreal version of happiness).
      How can you have a copy without an original, or a reference without a thing being pointed to?
      Also how is Disneyland a good example for either, if it is hyperreal and therefore a skewed (right word?) version of reality (so both a reference and an imperfect copy)?

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I too love reading books that speak the truths about the society we live in.

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