>let us take every possible care that young persons do not study philosophy too early.

>let us take every possible care that young persons do not study philosophy too early. For a young man is a sort of puppy who only plays with an argument; and is reasoned into and out of his opinions every day; he soon begins to believe nothing, and brings himself and philosophy into discredit.
is this true?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Yes but believing nothing can be a beneficial phase. If you go back to believing something after believing nothing then you will have a more nuanced understanding of what the belief actually is.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The issue seems to be that it's too variable to be reliable. A young Socrates can learn philosophy and turn out harmless, but a young Alcibiades, Critias, Charmides, or Aristoteles (the one in the dialogue Parmenides) seem to take it as an excuse to justify anything they do without shame.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Those homies were gonna do that shit anyway without philosophy

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Where is this from?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Never mind, I found it by googling

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      From Plato.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      If I remember correctly, Philebus

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >I plainly assert, that he who would truly live ought to allow his desires to wax to the uttermost, and not to chastise them; but when they have grown to their greatest he should have courage and intelligence to minister to them and to satisfy all his longings.
    >And this I affirm to be natural justice and nobility. To this however the many cannot attain; and they blame the strong man because they are ashamed of their own weakness, which they desire to conceal, and hence they say that intemperance is base.
    >As I have remarked already, they enslave the nobler natures, and being unable to satisfy their pleasures, they praise temperance and justice out of their own cowardice.
    >Plato, from the book Gorgias
    Uhhh... Platobros... He's actually pro-hedonism.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      No BAPpists allowed

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >injustice, when on a sufficient scale, has more strength and freedom and mastery than justice; and, as I said at first, justice is the interest of the stronger, whereas injustice is a man’s own profit and interest.
      >Plato's Republic, Book I
      That's right. Plato is a hedonist, an egoist, and he believes this absolutely: Might makes right.

      uuhhh based?

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >injustice, when on a sufficient scale, has more strength and freedom and mastery than justice; and, as I said at first, justice is the interest of the stronger, whereas injustice is a man’s own profit and interest.
    >Plato's Republic, Book I
    That's right. Plato is a hedonist, an egoist, and he believes this absolutely: Might makes right.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >for by the rule of nature, to suffer injustice is the greater disgrace because the greater evil; but conventionally, to do evil is the more disgraceful. For the suffering of injustice is not the part of a man, but of a slave, who indeed had better die than live; since when he is wronged and trampled upon, he is unable to help himself, or any other about whom he cares. The reason, as I conceive, is that the makers of laws are the majority who are weak; and they make laws and distribute praises and censures with a view to themselves and to their own interests; and they terrify the stronger sort of men, and those who are able to get the better of them, in order that they may not get the better of them; and they say, that dishonesty is shameful and unjust; meaning, by the word injustice, the desire of a man to have more than his neighbours; for knowing their own inferiority, I suspect that they are too glad of equality.
    Also from Gorgias. These are Plato's unironic views, chuds, just like this is Plato's view:
    >And these two customs, one the love of youth, and the other the practice of philosophy and virtue in general, ought to meet in one, and then the beloved may honourably indulge the lover.
    (The Erastes provides education in return for sexual favors from the adolescent Eromenos) From the Symposium. Plato is a leftist that smashes the idea of objective morality and heteronormativity. He supports prostitution and free sex. Eat shit chuds.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      get out of my thread schizo

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I think believing nothing is actually the most logical standpoint to have in life

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      in cartesian sense, I would agree, modifying 'believing nothing' to 'doubting everything'

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Read Phædo and ponder on misologism

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >dude time and energy is limited but we shouldn't have young people pursue something as early as possible because they will have a dumb opinion
    Is plato moronic?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      That's not what the passage says.

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