Lua

I love this motherfricker like you wouldn't believe.

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Ruby > Lua.

    At least we can agree Python sucks though.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      ruby was killed by webshits and nobody cares about mruby except japs

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        How was it killed by webshits, when web dev is the sole reason it was ever as popular as it was?

        And regardless of which, popularity should not be a factor when comparing languages.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          webshits invented Rails, which became synonymous with Ruby
          Rails is just Django but mediocre
          >And regardless of which, popularity should not be a factor when comparing languages.
          ecosystem and community are as important as the language itself. Lua isn't "popular" but it's not outright dead like Ruby is

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Ruby is slow and bloated.
      Lua has the state of the art LuaJIT, and has a very lean standard library.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        ruby has a JIT too now. too bad it's worthless for anything except rails

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Most JITs cannot compete with LuaJIT.
          Even the JavaScript V8 engine with a trillion dollar company behind it, is slower than LuaJIT made by one guy.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >and has a very lean standard library.
        [1]

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I don't understand the hatred towards python, it's a good scripting language, performances are good enough for what it is and you have craptons of libs written in C if needed.
      it does the job very well and the language is getting better and better at a regular pace nowadays.
      sure it's not perfect but as a scripting language it btfo basically everything else unless maybe if you need to embed a scripting language into your program and that's where lua shines beacuse it's smaller and simplier...
      I simply can't understand how you can hate python given how versatile it is, I'm a C/C++ dev, I use python a lot to automate tasks and to generate C++ code, it's a net positive in my job

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        My hatred towards Python is not the language itself but the developers utilizing it. I am not kidding, I have never once gotten someone elses Python project to build. Out of dozens if not hundred, not one.
        >to build, what do you mean to build?
        Every Python project I know of that is worth using, either directly or indirectly relies on a C library and `pip` is not equipped to build + link it correctly.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          yeah I agree that it's a mess, I personally use virtualenv and requirements.txt and it's working fine, if I need to distribute it I make an executable I use pyinstaller

          > Language getting better and better
          Changing is it? The language is changing?

          IQfy permanently stocked with people the wrong side of DK curve.

          I don't understand your post, is it an attack against something I wrote or something?
          what's wrong with python devs trying to speed up the release cycle and tackling long-standing issues before a 4.0 release?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        > Language getting better and better
        Changing is it? The language is changing?

        IQfy permanently stocked with people the wrong side of DK curve.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Python itself is okay, but the tooling is a mess and the ecosystem is flooded with pure garbage made by "data scientists".

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Here's a chan written in Lua.
    https://github.com/neeshy/picochan

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Lua is my go-to language. I agree.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    It's pretty cool. I wish I had some reason to utilize it besides just configuring Neovim, but I usually don't. I either write a big program or a shell script and don't usually need something inbetween. The times I do have to work with Lua, I do enjoy it.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      More important than anything in the universe, if you run a Garry's Mod server you can customize all objects, weapon firing rates, damages, etc... all in Lua.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    in a better world far from here, people picked this over python

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Is Lua more like Ruby or more like Python?

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >I wish Lua had won against python
    Thank goodness it didn't. The number one benefit you should get from a scripting language as opposed to a compiled one is higher productivity – otherwise, you could just write it in C and have higher performance and lower resource usage. What good is a scripting language where I have to either implement every utility function myself, or look for and include an external library? Lua does not even have a round() function! [1] You can't just write print(some_table) [2], which makes using the REPL needlessly burdensome.

    Sure, as an embedded scripting language in very small, resource-constrained devices this is a good strategy, but that's a niche application.

    Even worse is the "arrays are hashtables in disguise" concept, because even though it might appear to be elegant, it doesn't work well in practice. In the end, you have to treat arrays and hashtables differently (see, e.g., pairs() and ipairs()), because – big surprise – arrays and hashtables are very different conceptually, so you don't gain much from unifying them.

    Also great is that if you set element #5 in a 10-element array to nil (maybe you write foo[5] = arg1, and arg1 comes from a caller), your array suddenly only has 4 elements. That's because the first nil in a hashtable demarks the end of an array. Similarly, you might get an array argument from a caller, check its length (4 elements), append a single value, and suddenly your array has 10 elements, instead of 5! That's terrible design.

    [1] But it does have functions to convert degrees to radians and back. How is that more important than round()?!

    [2] Lua will just print the address of the hashtable, which is completely useless if you want to see its contents

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Lua does not even have a round() function!
      Lua has math.ceil and math.floor - so it is trivial to make your own rounding function.

      Why is this important? Because Python (and also R) do the following:
      round(2.5) -> 2
      Don't believe me? Go ahead and try it.

      JavaScript uses the normal rounding strategy:
      Math.round(2.5) -> 3
      So does C/C++.

      Why do Python and R do this? There is a very good reason for this. It's called Banker's Rounding or Round to Nearest Even.
      In school, we are usually taught that the middle value, e.g. 0.5, rounds up.
      This has problems in Statistics, in that a round function upward biases your data.
      In Banker's Rounding, we round 0.5 to the nearest even number (0.5 -> 0), which removes the bias.

      However, because the round functions differ from what most people think is a rounding function, it's not really a good idea to hide the implementation detail from the programmer.

      Programmers are not Statisticians, so they may not understand the importance of "Banker's rounding" and hence they may be confused by what Python or R are doing.
      In other words, there is no "sane default" for round.

      Lua, by not providing a rounding function, lets the programmer explicitly control what they want.
      You won't get any counterintuitive results, because you defined the rounding function.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Lua's lack of excess is part of its design. There are various Lua libraries all over implementing every single function you could ask for. It's meant to be as complex as you, the programmer, require. Not to mention, Lua wasn't and still isn't maintained by some large corporate entities.
      You're not meant to set array elements to nil, you're meant to call table.remove(table, index). If you want to use integer keys for an array, you have to treat the structure like an array (or at least the integral keys part). Lua doesn't make any assumptions about whether your structure is an array or a dictionary, and it's not going to assume if array[index] = nil should be an array-like operation or a dictionary-like operation. The onus is on you.

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    i like the moon, the moon is based and cool
    lua means moon so it must also be based and cool
    im going to learn lua

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      The moon also contains a spirit of a young woman that sometimes gives mostly useless advise to the avatar.

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    lua is just the rolly dude from the robots movie i cant remember his name

    just search up rolling robot guy from the robots movie and thats the lua logo lol

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >brazil mentioned

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Lua was invented by a israelite

      as was Lisp

      why do israelites like tiny little languages and tiny little hats so much?

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    let's all löve Lua!

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      oh my child

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >starts counting on 1

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >anti-Lua posters when they get to tell their one joke

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I do that too.

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous
  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >1-indexed arrays

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