>On 17 November the Spaniards sacked the Inca army camp, in which they found great treasures of gold, silver and emeralds.

>On 17 November the Spaniards sacked the Inca army camp, in which they found great treasures of gold, silver and emeralds. Noticing their lust for precious metals, the captive Atahualpa offered to fill a large room once with gold and twice with silver within two months.[48] It is commonly believed that Atahualpa offered this ransom to regain his freedom, but Hemming says that he did so to save his life. None of the early chroniclers mention any commitment by the Spaniards to free Atahualpa once the metals were delivered.

>After several months in fear of an imminent attack from general Rumiñawi, the outnumbered Spanish considered Atahualpa to be too much of a liability and decided to execute him. Pizarro staged a mock trial and found Atahualpa guilty of revolting against the Spanish, practicing idolatry and murdering Huáscar, his brother. Atahualpa was sentenced to death by burning at the stake. He was horrified, since the Inca believed that the soul would not be able to go on to the afterlife if the body were burned.

>Friar Vincente de Valverde, who had earlier offered his breviary to Atahualpa, intervened, telling Atahualpa that, if he agreed to convert to Catholicism, the friar could convince Pizarro to commute the sentence. Atahualpa agreed to be baptized into the Catholic faith. In accordance with his request, he was executed by strangling with a garrote on 26 July 1533.

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Those earlier conquistadors what little more than mafias. The Spanish were forced to clear them all out once they started fighting among themselves. Shits crazy.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What's even the point of getting someone to "convert" under such conditions? Surely they didn't think "oh yeah this guy's a true Catholic, he's going to heaven now." Did they just take pleasure in having enough power of someone to make him renounce his most sacred beliefs?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      IIRC he recanted and asked why he should worship a guy who was killed

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Doubt it, Spanish took recanting seriously. If you were sentenced to burn and convert but then recant then they'd just burn you again.

        Probably just modern native coping bullshit that their last kings resisted.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Some genuinely wanted to save their souls. Most used it as a tool for power as you've described.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      pity

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Did they just take pleasure in having enough power of someone to make him renounce his most sacred beliefs?
      no they were just quixotic

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Simple as.

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    But it is true that he killed his brother (and tens of thousands more) just the year prior. It was very nice that Pizarro let him keep his servants in captivity and even offered him "salvation" to abate his fear of having no afterlife. Not the best thing Spain did, not the worst thing Spain did.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >just the year prior
      No, Atahualpa ordered the execution of his brother Huascar while Atahualpa himself was imprisoned by the Spanish. This occurred because Pizarro expressed a desire to meet Huascar.
      Supposedly Pizarro even said to Atahualpa that brothers shouldn't fight or something like that, well according to the official reports of Pizarro's notaries.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    europeans are so frickin evil man

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      nafris* are so frickin evil

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Those peaceful Vikings!

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah they should have let them rip the hearts out of children in peace!

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Yes those poor natives that drugged children and then sent them to the mountains to strangle them for their demonic rain god.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      that's just the business of running empires

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      yeah. they still refuse to recognize their wrongdoings. they'll get what's coming to them though kek

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >None of the early chroniclers mention any commitment by the Spaniards to free Atahualpa once the metals were delivered.
    Pizarro was illiterate, and the role of being the official recorder of events in Peru shifted several times due to various complicated factors. Except for a rare, very short pre-conquest report about the coastal people, all these accounts produced by the Pizarro expedition were published after Atahualpa's execution (in 1533), partly to counter-narratives that began to emerge in Spain.
    There was even an FRICKING PRINTED BOOK of the Pizarro expedition to the Inca Empire, produced and published wholly in Spain by 1524 (Cronica del Anonimo Sevillano, I don't know its English title), obviously with the help of men who had been in Peru the previous year. This was the first account of the conquest of the Inca Empire and there were probably more now lost.
    Pizarro swiftly had his men produce official documents (the first published being the chronicle of Francisco de Xerez, sometimes mistaken as the first published account of the conquest) to dispute certain by-then-well-known events that cast him in a bad light, including the execution of Atahualpa, was quickly and highly criticized by the governor of Panama in 1533, who informed the Spanish king.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >There was even an FRICKING PRINTED BOOK of the Pizarro expedition to the Inca Empire, produced and published wholly in Spain by 1524 (Cronica del Anonimo Sevillano, I don't know its English title)
      It goes without saying that it was created without Pizarro's sponsorship. There is a set of authors who wrote early accounts of the conquests despite never having been in Inca territory, let alone the New World as a whole. This is because some books about the matter became very popular, basically turning into the bestsellers of their time.

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >After several months in fear of an imminent attack from general Rumiñawi, the outnumbered Spanish considered Atahualpa to be too much of a liability and decided to execute him. Pizarro staged a mock trial and found Atahualpa guilty of revolting against the Spanish, practicing idolatry and murdering Huáscar, his brother. Atahualpa was sentenced to death by burning at the stake. He was horrified, since the Inca believed that the soul would not be able to go on to the afterlife if the body were burned.

    Rumiñawi was in Quito, and I haven't come across any source that directly places him in the situation described, though it's understandable how some might infer his involvement, since Quito is close to Cajamarca (but it is unlikely this specific army even existed as I said below).

    Although it was expected that the rooms would be filled with gold within two months, 9 months had passed, and the influx of metal to Cajamarca had dwindled to a minimum, with the rooms still unfilled, the promise of Atahualpa never materialized

    Furthermore, a new group of Spaniards led by Almagro had arrived, and the Pizarro faction was reluctant to share any part of the ransom. Initially, they resisted, but the threat of war from Almagro's party compelled them to share a portion, albeit significantly less, a tiny amount in comparison, though it was substantial in any other context

    Consequently, Almagro's men were eager to proceed to Cusco, rumored to be abundantly rich in gold. However, Atahualpa and his now dwindling resources not shared with them were an obstacle

    Adding to the tension, suspiciously shortly after Almagro arrived, an army not of Incas but of "Indios Caribes" (a term implying cannibalism but also used to describe the naked, bow-wielding type of natives), was allegedly sighted by an Indian informant serving Almagro, I believe it was Felipillo, though I'm not certain, but he later admitted to fabricating stories to facilitate Atahualpa's execution

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      And it wasn't that rumors persisted for months, as your source claims. On the very day this army was allegedly seen, an immense one at that, a furious Almagro brought his Indian informant to Pizarro, forcing him to speak.

      Then, they dispatched the two Hernandos (Pizarro and de Soto) to investigate the claims.

      However, tension remained high in the camp, especially among Almagro's followers.

      This led the Spanish to hastily sentence and execute Atahualpa even before the Hernandos could return and refute these claims. It is reported that the Almagros, who were close to Atahualpa, deeply regretted his execution.

      It is believed that Pizarro agreed to the execution to gain favor with the Almagro faction, though they would rebel later.

      In the trial, Atahualpa's fate was nearly averted, with the decision to execute him allegedly winning by just one vote. By this time, the Spanish had spent significant time with Atahualpa, some growing close to him, playing table games and the like. Members of the Almagro faction had not met him until this point, so it was very different for them.

      But in any case, a more careful examination indicates that some of the Spanish who supposedly decided Atahualpa's fate were not even in Cajamarca at the time.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        By then, significant figures from across the Empire had come to Cajamarca, seeking to forge alliances with the Spanish. This included the eldest offspring of Wayna Qhapaq (father of Atahualpa and Huascar), his daughter Azarpay, his only child from his first Royal marriage, Azarpay was then a middle-aged woman. Her brother and husband, Toparpa (Tupac Huallpa), was quickly installed as Sapa Inca in Cajamarca but died under mysterious circumstances in Xauxa, in the middle of the long journey from Cajamarca to Cusco, suspected of being poisoned due to old grudges from the Inca civil war.

        But the Spanish were fortunate. They learned of a young high-ranking Inca who made king, a son of Wayna Qhapaq named Manco Inca, living in hiding in a satellite city near Cusco. Presented to them in rags by their allies, Manco Inca had been evading Atahualpa for nearly a year by constantly moving across the countryside, having survived the genocide of one of Cusco's most influential royal clans by an Atahualpa general, the Qhapaq Ayllu, the main backers of the war against Atahualpa.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          The Spanish also had allies among non-Incan factions, such as Francisco Chilche Cañari, a Cañari chieftain and former page to Wayna Qhapaq. He may have been the Cañari who defied Atahualpa shortly before the Spanish arrival, leading to Atahualpa's retaliatory massacre in Cañari lands. This chieftain loved combat and expressed to one of Atahualpa's commanders, his disappointment at not being able to confront Atahualpa directly, when Atahualpa heard of this, it is reported that a smirk appeared on his face, prompting orders for Chilche's capture, not death, as he wanted to have him under his command.
          After Atahualpa's capture by the Spanish, he was among those Cañari who approached the Spaniards in Cajamarca, bowing before them and swore allegiance to the Spanish in recognition of the capture of the disdained Atahualpa
          During Manco Inca's rebellion, the fugitive Inca sent an army to conquer Cusco, and the Spanish were approached by one of his Inca commanders who challenged them to single combat, which Chilche accepted on their behalf, beheading the Inca noble and returning with a smile. Decades later, now an elder with an estate in the Yucay Valley near Cusco, Chilche once caused a commotion in the city by displaying the head of this Inca during a festival.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Remember the rooms that Atahualpa promised to fill with treasure as his ransom?
        Well, the rooms were filled but some of the treasure caravans never had the time to arrive to Cajamarca - they diverted to caches around Peru.
        They have never been found...

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >During the many months of Atahualpa’s captivity, a number of the Spaniards grew fond of the native emperor, especially Hernando de Soto and Hernando Pizarro. The two Spanish captains even taught the Inca emperor how to play chess and spent hours with him enjoying the game. Atahualpa soon became proficient and gave chess the name of taptana, or ‘surprise attack,’ thoroughly enjoying the game’s obvious parallels with military strategy.

    >One afternoon, in the final moves of a match between Soto and Riquelme, Hernando made a move toward putting the knight into play, and the Inca, touching him lightly on the arm, said to him in a low voice: “No, captain, no… the rook!” After a few brief seconds of reflection, Hernando played the castle, as Atahualpa had advised him, and a few moves later, Riquelme experienced the inevitable checkmate.

    >After that match Hernando de Soto would invite the Inca to play with him, and after a couple months the pupil was already a credit to his teacher, playing as his equal. Other Spaniards would invite Atahualpa to play, but he always abstained, telling each of them through the interpreter Felipillo: “I play very little, and Your Grace plays a great deal!”

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Where did you get that from?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        main source for the story comes from Juan de Betanzos (1510-1576), writing is from Last Days of the Inca (2008) and Ricardo Palma (1838-1919). not too far-fetched considering he was holed up with the conquistadors for nearly a year

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    damn thats gangsta

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