o'Neill cylinder

I don't know much about space or engineering

is this shit realistic and will it actually happen in the medium future like 50/100 years?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    the only way to build space-based megastructures is to source material off planet and use construction robots.
    there's been some cool research into the latter, but i think we are still a long ways off from mining in space.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    at that scale it's kinda claustrophobic. it's better than nothing but pretty bleak. hurtling in a balloon through space, can randomly pop from some rock smashing into it at high speeds.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I don't think you'd experience claustrophobia in such an environment. Maybe ennui, but through a long stretch of human civilization most people didn't go any further than the boundaries of their own village. I won't say that's an ideal existence, but they were content enough.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        some people did go out of their village, that's how we colonized earth. the mental freedom to go to some other place is kind of important.
        in 1-2 years I'd know every nook and cranny of that vessel, inside and outside, and I'd be bored out of my mind of it. it is pretty dark. at least for me

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >some people did go out of their village, that's how we colonized earth.
          No shit, autist, but most people were bound to their village for much of the past 5000 years. So no, you will not go insane just because you live in an O'Neill cylinder.
          >the mental freedom to go to some other place is kind of important
          It's on the hierarchy of needs, but not fundamental.
          >in 1-2 years I'd know every nook and cranny of that vessel, inside and outside, and I'd be bored out of my mind of it. it is pretty dark. at least for me
          Nice blog.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            yeah clearly you know there's no way such a detail can frick the whole thing up, in time.
            the concept is moronic. building Earth-like environment to cater to human form instead of like adjusting the human form for certain conditions.
            it's like a child's idea about "consciousness in space", it's laughable.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >at that scale it's kinda claustrophobic
      yes, that's the worst picture I've ever seen of one

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >dude muh gay soience fiction space fantasy

    [...]

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Technically possible? Yes. Will we do it in the next century? No. A century from now we might not even have jet powered aircraft.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I don't see why we would have jet powered aircraft when solar power aircraft are so much better for the environment.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        A century from how we might not have the technology to build solar cells.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Go to youtube and look up a playthrough of zone of the enders 1, it should only be 2 to 3 hours long. The setting takes place in a O neill cylinder orbiting the planet jupiter, great game real futuristic.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Think smaller

    http://www.artificial-gravity.com/sw/SpinCalc/

    If a single starship could be made to rotate on its longest axis at 4rpm, you could achieve a decent 0.45g at the nose. If the center of mass was closer to the engines, you could do even better.

    The sierra space 19m habitat could give you 0.16g @ 4rpm

    If you launched some inflatable donut at 100 meters diameter, that's 0.5g @ 3rpm

    Play with it and have fun

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      4rpm is barf city

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        You slowly spin it up until people complain. A lot of people could tolerate even 6rpm if it took a week to spin up to that rate.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    A century from now we might not even have cylinders

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      There are more bikes in my back garden than there are stars in a galaxy - science Black person

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    you better stock up on your o'Neill cylinders people. they might be gone tomorrow

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They might happen, but they won't be larping as rural lifestyle blocks. Enjoy your kowloon walled city in space.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Yes, they're reasonable and require no new science to build. They do require some new economics to work. Luckily, rapidly reusable, cheap, superheavy rockets are being built now.

    Here's a post I wrote a year ago, it shows how much more stuff Starship can enable. And the things it can bring to space will enable turning big asteroids/small moons (Deimos & Phobos) into habitats.
    !
    The scale and importance of Starship is still greatly underestimated. I made a rough calculation of Starship upmass using some basic assumptions (1 new rocket [superheavy+starship] is added to the fleet per month. [~500 raptors/year @ 6+33=39 per stack; 500/39 ~12]
    Each rocket can get 150 tonnes to LEO per launch
    Each rocket will fly once per day
    Assuming flights start Jan 1 2024....

    >For comparison to real things:

    After 3 flights, you've launched 450 tonnes, which is more than the 420 tonne ISS [which took more than 40 flights to assemble!]

    After 6 months, you've sent mass up equal to a US supercarrier [100,000 tonnes]

    In about a year, you could launch the of the Momentum Limited Orion Nuclear Pulse ship. This ship was designed in the 1960's to use contemporary tech to get humans to Alpha Centauri quickly by periodically detonating nuclear bombs and using their energy to gradually push the ship to 3% of the speed of light. [400,000 tonnes]

    Before 4 years, you've sent more than the total US Navy tonnage [4,635,628 tonnes]

    >The scale and economies of Starship are so ridiculous that science fiction things can actually happen.

    The Nostromo [bulk carrier from Alien] is ~ 63,000 tonnes, so that could be launched in the first 4 months of Starship operations.

    The USS Enterprise NCC-1701 is 190,000 tonnes, so that could be launched in about 9 months.

    The Donnager [Martian flagship in the Expanse] is ~250,000 tonnes, so that could be launched in about 11 months.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    No, it will never happen, I'm sorry

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Medium future 100 years
    We’ll be daycare for brown morons at that point. No high tech utopia, just production for the sake of giving free food in exchange for brown votes.

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    can this thread be saved?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      silly idea makes no sense. why would I ever want to go in one? apart from novelty there's nothing there.
      >but you are in space
      we're in space on Earth as well. it's basically the same shit, different scale. Earth is more convenient, gravity, more stuff, less risk.
      >but travel to ...
      in active form? that's fricking moronic. and insanely expensive anyway.
      would visit for a few days at most.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Travel will cost nothing in space. You could fire pods at a modest velocity towards different nearby habitats with little to no fuel spent. If it was just one habitat I see your point, but if it kept growing it could be quite an interesting place.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          there are two types of people. the ones who instantly understand the insanity of it, and children.
          any humans you put in such a vessel will instantly become their own species, in all senses. one because they will diverge from humans on earth, and second you have no control over what happens next in that tube. the most powerful of them can enslave everyone in a horror type scenario. becomes Dark fricking City.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            You understand there's places like that NOW, in the US? There are islands in Alaska where the poorest can't afford a plane ticket out. They aren't much better than old fashioned company towns.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            that's unironically like Hawaii. people go there, fail, become homeless and can't get back to the mainland.

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The physics are sound but no we won't build one any time soon. It's a massive undertaking and there is simply no benefit.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      if you had left off the last 6 word you could have sounded smart, but no

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >curves in both directions
        Stupid illustration

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous
          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I don't know why these are always depicted as a having a single floor. It would be much more dense and 3D packed that that. No use wasting all that volume.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            because that's what people want

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            In the early 90s tv show Babylon 5, there were many levels, with just an empty core in the center. The problem with levels is that each one ends up with different gravity. Also the differential between your head and your feet gets worse the closer you are to the center. Things start going somewhat sideways. Machinery would need to account for these difference and humans would have various health and behavioral impacts. The outermost level might end up being the most desirable because gravity would be the most stable there.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            in practice it would become a dark densely packed rat dystopia with tight walkways and shit everywhere.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            This assumes we run out of material to build these colonies. The Asteroid Belt is yuuge.
            There could be many colonies each one sparsely populated.
            Now, where you may have a point, is if one of these colonies is full of misfits (or Mormons) and decides to cut itself off from the others. Like, by becoming a generation-ship and launching itself at Wolf 359 or Trappist-1 or some nearby dim bulb like that.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            The world would be like a Mario 64 level. There would just be a wall, and beyond that nothing exists. A surreal and confined space.

            Look at that tree on the far left. Growing at the edge of the world. Its leaves brushing against the firmament. It's over there in a corner, and beyond that there is nothing.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            yeah, seems like it would be cool af, don't it?

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They're entirely possible to build even at quite large sizes. The issue is economics. It's difficult to do that much of anything so far away when you can't get resources on site. In addition to that there's also the problem of lack of use case, thus leaving little justification for building one.
    With increasing access to space enabling both the construction of ever larger objects in space and opening up the possibility for zero-g manufacturing and even potentially tourism I think it is likely we will see some sizeable artificial gravity habitats this century. Probably nothing on the scale of hundreds or even tens of square kilometers, but perhaps a few.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      whats picrel

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ZBLAN
        tl;dr extremely pure fiber optic cables with minimal imperfections thanks to zero-g.

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    nice idea, unfortunately a big rotating cylinder in space is not stable

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      counter rotating section

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    pressure is already a mayor issue, as well as for fictional mars domes
    https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=60366.0

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >withstanding 1atm pressure differential is impossibru!!!!!!!!!
      lol

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >medium future like 50/100 years?
    Nope. Even if we ignore dysgenics, land prices would need to dramatically increase for space land to be economical.

    1m^2 land in space = 10m deep earth(30t) + extra 20t for house to sit on top = ~50t per 1m^2. If we assume elon makes $100/kg orbit = $5,000,000 per square meter in space. Not even NYC apartments are that costly

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I was about to say: what if the perk is escaping Black folk
      But then I realised the Black folk dont deserve Earth and they should be the ones to be sent to space (habitat optional)

  19. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    50/100 = 1/2
    None of this will be possible in six months.

  20. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Here's a favorite of mine, I wish i was this guy.

  21. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    post heating bill, just for the lake.

  22. 1 month ago
    Anonymous
  23. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >is this shit realistic and will it actually happen in the medium future like 50/100 years?
    Depends entirely on the degree space becomes industrialized in that time and how cheap launch costs are.
    If rockets like starship and other high tonnage reusable rockets become commonplace and launch costs drop significantly we might see the beginnings of lunar industrialization in a few decades, if it becomes possible/cost effective to mine large quantities of metal from the lunar surface and launch it into orbit you can bet somebody will try to build very large space stations including an O'Neil cylinder.
    It's more a problem of practicality and cost than technology.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >mine large quantities of metal from the lunar surface and launch it into orbit you can bet somebody will try to build very large space stations
      this or just turn a gravel pile like Deimos into a "concrete" station like this one:

      https://i.imgur.com/7kwmFLq.jpg

      if you had left off the last 6 word you could have sounded smart, but no

      , and it's already in Mars orbit as a bonus

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Furthermore, we already build megastructures capable of withstanding the forces of a rotating space habitat. It's just a matter of having access to cheap resources from space.

  24. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    bumping

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      L1 looks comfy

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