Personally, I did Wheelock's first and I don't regret it.

Personally, I did Wheelock's first and I don't regret it. But I'd recommend this first for anyone else I know because I'm not a pussy and most everyone else is. And even if you did do traditional elementary level G-T learning this is a great supplement and quickly turns your accrued theoretical knowledge into practical instinct.

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Had you studied any Latin-based languages prior to beginning these two books, and how much progress do you believe one can make by working through this book?
    Non scholae, sed vitae discimus.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Let me know where I can find a community of Latin speakers to learn from. Maybe there are some monasteries.

      what happens when you get to words you don't know? Anyone going into with can figure out the first hand full of pages Roma, Europa, Graecia but context clues aren't so easy in a language you don't understand

      Wouldn't a shorter book then Wheelock's explaining the basics before Lingua Latina be better?
      then just jumping into it?

      They provide very good context clues and sometimes pictures/definitions (in latin) referring to words and concepts you've already learned. It may be more "difficult" to learn words this way than looking up an english translation but I find it helps with retention a lot to embed the term in a web of latin referents instead of just tying it to a few english words.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >Let me know where I can find a community of Latin speakers

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    what happens when you get to words you don't know? Anyone going into with can figure out the first hand full of pages Roma, Europa, Graecia but context clues aren't so easy in a language you don't understand

    Wouldn't a shorter book then Wheelock's explaining the basics before Lingua Latina be better?
    then just jumping into it?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      No.
      The entire point is that you encounter words you don't know and feel the perceived application/meaning of the word, then apply that perception from there.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Look them up and struggle through until the words start defining themselves in the margins, you’ll get plenty of IMPOOT regarding the early words the more you read, so it’s not much of sacrifice

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >when you get to words you don't know
      You were born with no words. How did you learn the first one?

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The fundamental thing is that Latin is a natural human language and not, in essence, different from other natural human languages.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Puerum parvum nigrum iratum esse sentio

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Cur me iratam esse sentis?

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    RRRRROOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOM' IN IIIIIIITALIAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA'ST

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Caecilius?

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    uhhhhhhhh roma in italia est

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    so this is a beginner textbook? I love Wheelock's but I'd love to learn from square one from two different authors

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I started with LLPSI and enjoyed it. It took me a few false starts to get all the way through. But eventually I not only finished Familia Romana but also Roma Aeterna. I also read through Fabulae Faciles, Epitome Historiae Sacrae, and several books from the Vulgate. Then I was able to slowly hack my way through De Bello Gallico. Trying to read poetry was like slamming into a brick wall, though.

    I go through periods of waxing and waning interest in Latin. I can always pick up the Vulgate or some easier medieval authors. But real classical authors are still hard, and poetry is impossible. I feel like I'm permanently stuck in an intermediate plateau and real fluency is always out of reach.

    I picked up Athenaze recently so I can repeat the struggle but with Greek.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      This is me. I believe we need structured environments for periods of high intensity learning with some kind of stakes - tests and assignments etc. - to overcome these plateaux. Academia basically.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      This is me. I believe we need structured environments for periods of high intensity learning with some kind of stakes - tests and assignments etc. - to overcome these plateaux. Academia basically.

      Reading Latin poetry is at stage 11 in this guide.
      https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1TugURNkc0461IQoToKIlE4hnnbRykRYYxvrfl2X90No/

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Don't take this guide seriously.
        The gay in question : https://www.youtube.com/@justinlearnslatin8530

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          i don't really agree with his method especially considering how much he had to defer reading Roma Aeterna after finishing FR but the amout of Latin he has been able to read is impressive. i get really tired after like 30 minutes.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Thats why LLPSI is shit.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Going over readers only makes you good at reading reader, not real latin. My advice would be to get into caesar as soon as possible, not to mention having good foundations in grammar beforehands.

      Once having read enough easy prose (authentic prose; caesar, nepos, florus, Cicero**), one can start poetry with catullus.

      I would also advice you to avoid the vulgate and any medieval latin in the begining of your learning, until you can read Cicero. (I'm not gonna expand on that)

      Composition will be important later, once you are good enough at reading.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I’ve read Caesar, Nepos, and Florus. I’m still painfully slow at reading and Catullus is more or less impenetrable. Cicero seems hard but readable, but I haven’t made a major effort there because he seems so dull. I just can’t get excited about legal cases.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          What about his essays on philosophy (de senectute, de amicitia,..), they seem pretty easy.
          And about Catullus, poets tend to get easier, as you read more of them.
          Good luck, anon!

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            It would seem this way but his letters and legal cases are by far more interesting works imo.

            Going over readers only makes you good at reading reader, not real latin. My advice would be to get into caesar as soon as possible, not to mention having good foundations in grammar beforehands.

            Once having read enough easy prose (authentic prose; caesar, nepos, florus, Cicero**), one can start poetry with catullus.

            I would also advice you to avoid the vulgate and any medieval latin in the begining of your learning, until you can read Cicero. (I'm not gonna expand on that)

            Composition will be important later, once you are good enough at reading.

            >going over readers only make you better at reading readers
            no

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >Catullus is more or less impenetrable.
          kek
          behold the LLPSI cuck

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Bad advice. I'm not that advanced in Latin but going through Greek readers like Athenaze and Thrasymachus has helped me with reading fluency a lot.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Greek is different from latin.

          It would seem this way but his letters and legal cases are by far more interesting works imo.
          [...]
          >going over readers only make you better at reading readers
          no

          What I'm trying to say is that the over reliance on readers, causes the learner to find authentic text hard or even alien.
          I'm not against readers, but I think that if you want to be able to read authentic text, you should ditch readers the moment you are able confortable with caesar, an that would be after finishing Famila romana.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            What do you mean by authentic text? Because if you mean the original text then those readers contain the original text

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Most of the time, readers modify the original text to make it more accessible for the learner. Which gives a wrong sense of the text that you will encounter when reading the original.
            What would be the point then of readers if they had authentic text ? why wouldn't you go read the original then ? why isn't the anon above able to do that ?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            In the case of LLPSI, the readers are heavily annotated in the same way that the rest of the series is
            The majority of readers are selections of authentic text, usually arranged in order of difficulty and with extensive notes
            If there is a modification, the modification will be leaving out difficult passages, not changing the wording

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous
          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I've never seen Roma Aeterna referred to as a reader but I guess at the end it does become one
            When I said LLPSI reader I meant the readers like De Bello Gallico

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            There has been a misunderstanding, what I mean by readers is the likes of FR, RA, epitome historiae sacrae, ad alpes and such.
            As for De Bello gallico (LLPSI), it is more of a student edition of the text, which is fine, but I would suggest a loeb (interlinear translation) instead of a student edition.

            Do you think it's worth reading the grammar sections first before you tackle the text of each chapter?

            Why not, grammar is always a plus.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Wheelock's is better, if you just read the sentences aloud and comprehend them. If you don't comprehend, reread the vocab lists, then read the sentence out again only in Latin til you get it. Don't do mental translation. This is better than ROMA IN ITALIA EST for 6 months.
    >bbut muh natural method
    You're not an ancient Roman child. People who learned Latin in antiquity used word lists with glosses into their native language, it's fine.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      alTHOUGH I learned Ancient Greek before Latin so maybe if you've never learned a language before it's better to start with LLPSI.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Don't be such a homosexual both are good. LLPSI Black folk negatively polarized me against their gay little book for a long time but it turns out it's alright.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I started with D'Ooge, I enjoyed the excerpts from Herculean mythology and the various Roman excerpts and poetry thrown in. Imperator milites hortator.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I read the preview for LLPSI on Amazon. It's crazy how intuitive it is even only knowing English, and not any Romance language.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I'm curious about how somebody with no prior experience feels about the difficulty curve of the book. Having finished Wheelock's I found llpsi almost painfully boring up until cap xi or so but am impressed with the pace at which he introduces grammar. I wonder how much extra drilling and practice a complete novice needs on their way through llpsi and what chapters they would find particularly difficult. I've heard it really ramps up in the last couple chapters but haven't yet read that far.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Do you think it's worth reading the grammar sections first before you tackle the text of each chapter?

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