Plato died as a slave

https://twitter.com/eigenrobot/status/1782937174410752450

Oh no no, classical bros.

Plato died as a slave, according to the herculareum texts.

How do we cope, now?

Thalidomide Vintage Ad Shirt $22.14

Yakub: World's Greatest Dad Shirt $21.68

Thalidomide Vintage Ad Shirt $22.14

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Freedom is temporary
    Wisdom is eternal

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      He didn't have wisdom. He had knowledge.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Plato is actually defensive of Sparta in many dialogues (Second Alcibiades) so that is a huge irony if true.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >inb4 Peripateticgays proclaim victory

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Good, he almost totally ruined Western philosophy before it got started. Hope he suffered the little b***h, so much he became the Ideal b***h

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >he almost totally ruined Western philosophy
      I can tell you never read Plato but just heard some youtuber say that.

      https://i.imgur.com/Mg0Onir.jpeg

      https://twitter.com/eigenrobot/status/1782937174410752450

      Oh no no, classical bros.

      Plato died as a slave, according to the herculareum texts.

      How do we cope, now?

      404bc was when Athens lost the Peloponnesian war. He did his writing after that and opened up the Academy so he couldn't have been a slave.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        There's youtubers with based philosophical insights, sign me up

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    He died in Athens 50 years after this event. He was certainly not a slave by then.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >18 Plato, it seems, was the first to bring to Athens the mimes of Sophron which had been neglected, and to draw characters in the style of that writer; a copy of the mimes, they say, was actually found under his pillow. He made three voyages to Sicily, the first time to see the island and the craters of Etna: on this occasion Dionysius, the son of Hermocrates, being on the throne, forced him to become intimate with him. But when Plato held forth on tyranny and maintained that the interest of the ruler alone was not the best end, unless he were also pre‑eminent in virtue, he offended Dionysius, who in his anger exclaimed, "You talk like an old dotard." 19 "And you like a tyrant," rejoined Plato. At this the tyrant grew furious and at first was bent on putting him to death; then, when he had been dissuaded from this by Dion and Aristomenes, he did not indeed go so far but handed him over to Pollis the Lacedaemonian, who had just then arrived on an embassy, with orders to sell him into slavery. p295 And Pollis took him to Aegina and there offered him for sale. And then Charmandrus, the son of Charmandrides, indicted him on a capital charge according to the law in force among the Aeginetans, to the effect that the first Athenian who set foot upon the island should be put to death without a trial. This law had been passed by the prosecutor himself, according to Favorinus in his Miscellaneous History. But when some one urged, though in jest, that the offender was a philosopher, the court acquitted him. There is another version to the effect that he was brought before the assembly and, being kept under close scrutiny, he maintained an absolute silence and awaited the issue with confidence. The assembly decided not to put him to death but to sell him just as if he were a prisoner of war.
      >20 Anniceris the Cyrenaic happened to be present and ransomed him for twenty minae — according to others the sum was thirty minae — and dispatched him to Athens to his friends, who immediately remitted the money. But Anniceris declined it, saying that the Athenians were not the only people worthy of the privilege of providing for Plato. Others assert that Dion sent the money and that Anniceris would not take it, but bought for Plato the little garden which is in the Academy.
      https://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/Diogenes_Laertius/Lives_of_the_Eminent_Philosophers/3/Plato*.html

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      What a shame

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Hypothetically, I could frick my males slaves in the ass right? Then make them shit out my come and make them lick it up off the ground?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I mean only as much as you could do that now to anyone off the street. Many states had strict laws about slavery, and even not serving them wine of the same quality as yourself was grounds in some areas to lose the bondage you had over them. If you fricked them in the ass (by force) and they escaped, they'd probably go to a judge and have you hanged for it. Anal rape was considered a very uncool crime even back then.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >your mind on late 20c antislavery propaganda

      https://i.imgur.com/oCObxJ8.png

      He died in Athens 50 years after this event. He was certainly not a slave by then.

      based basic information poster

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        That's not the same enslavement.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        That's not the same enslavement.

        "The philosopher was then taken to the island of Aegina to be sold. There, he was recognised by someone called Anniceris and was ransomed for twenty minas."

        But Aegina was invaded by the Spartans. Maybe he did live with the Spartans and was freed only later.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      i fricking hate homosexuals

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Plato was one. This is why it's so important to clear this up. His entire philosophy might be based on power and corruption.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          The Republic's solution is completely totalitarian. That's for sure.

          Him being gay is surely why he thinks women have the same capacities. That's clearly not true.

          Women are irrational in their search for power. Just like gay men.

          Desire is the enemy and always has been.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Don't we all?

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Fitting

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >not one person mentions that OP has mistaken socrates for plato somehow

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Do gay men have penis envy? Is that why they're attracted to men?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Gay men are much more often envious of women or envious of men who benefit in the ways that women typically do.
      Bodybuilders and actors and rock stars aren't gay because of a penis thing. They want lots of other men to look at them. The guy who developed his sense of fashion and various pleasantries is probably emulating someone like Martha Stewart. Penises are a means to an end. That's why some gays decide they'd rather chop it off in the quest of being a real woman.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >So gays think in their head they don't have penises?
        They have abnormal psychosexual differentiation. Of course they know certain facts but don't see how those add up to some obvious heterosexual outcome. The same is true for the heterosexual man who could never see how gay sex is a correct conclusion. But he orients himself to being a man who finds union with a woman, even if he is not the most masculine. Likewise lots of gays are hyper masculine but it's so they can attract other men.

        I'm only interested in the phallic element. Why is it that gay men identify with women?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Women have penis envy because they blame their mothers for having castrated them. Did the mothers of gay men castrate them?

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >reddit spacing

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >newbie meme
      We were putting spaces between lines before you were even a sperm cell in my ball sack.
      https://old.sage.moe/b/thread/2229/#q2232

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        haha ur old

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        desperate cope. your google search is revealing

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >You lose because you have evidence!
          You are a wonderful testament to the education and reasoning skills of zoomer newbies. The most stupid porn addict on old IQfy is a Senior Wrangler compared to the smartest intellectual on new IQfy.

          https://i.imgur.com/6YKaVLr.jpeg

          haha ur old

          IQfy belongs to the millennials.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >I wish I could get laid.
        Things haven't changed so much after all.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Are these new findings?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      They are from the Herculaneum papyri.

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    wow i didnt really know that plato was a slave

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    This just confirms that "The Republic" was based on Sparta. He lived as a slave there for many years, and once he returned to Athens he was awe-struck by their society.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Bullshit. He was a free man when he wrote the Republic and was enslaved after.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        but he wrote Republic after 404.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          No, he wrote The Republic in the 4th century BC, decades after his enslavement.

          Who freed him?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Anniceris the Cyrenaic

            https://i.imgur.com/yaLzCPu.jpeg

            >18 Plato, it seems, was the first to bring to Athens the mimes of Sophron which had been neglected, and to draw characters in the style of that writer; a copy of the mimes, they say, was actually found under his pillow. He made three voyages to Sicily, the first time to see the island and the craters of Etna: on this occasion Dionysius, the son of Hermocrates, being on the throne, forced him to become intimate with him. But when Plato held forth on tyranny and maintained that the interest of the ruler alone was not the best end, unless he were also pre‑eminent in virtue, he offended Dionysius, who in his anger exclaimed, "You talk like an old dotard." 19 "And you like a tyrant," rejoined Plato. At this the tyrant grew furious and at first was bent on putting him to death; then, when he had been dissuaded from this by Dion and Aristomenes, he did not indeed go so far but handed him over to Pollis the Lacedaemonian, who had just then arrived on an embassy, with orders to sell him into slavery. p295 And Pollis took him to Aegina and there offered him for sale. And then Charmandrus, the son of Charmandrides, indicted him on a capital charge according to the law in force among the Aeginetans, to the effect that the first Athenian who set foot upon the island should be put to death without a trial. This law had been passed by the prosecutor himself, according to Favorinus in his Miscellaneous History. But when some one urged, though in jest, that the offender was a philosopher, the court acquitted him. There is another version to the effect that he was brought before the assembly and, being kept under close scrutiny, he maintained an absolute silence and awaited the issue with confidence. The assembly decided not to put him to death but to sell him just as if he were a prisoner of war.
            >20 Anniceris the Cyrenaic happened to be present and ransomed him for twenty minae — according to others the sum was thirty minae — and dispatched him to Athens to his friends, who immediately remitted the money. But Anniceris declined it, saying that the Athenians were not the only people worthy of the privilege of providing for Plato. Others assert that Dion sent the money and that Anniceris would not take it, but bought for Plato the little garden which is in the Academy.
            https://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/Diogenes_Laertius/Lives_of_the_Eminent_Philosophers/3/Plato*.html

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            The common version of the tale is that Plato was eventually bought by Anniceris, a philosopher from Cyrene, who freed him and helped him return to Athens.

            Doesn't the OP say he died as a slave?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            OP can actually be wrong sometimes

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Nobody said OP was wrong until now. The truth is he don't know for sure what happened.

            In any case The Republic ism't pro or against Sparta.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >he don't know
            We don't know.

            Gay men are much more often envious of women or envious of men who benefit in the ways that women typically do.
            Bodybuilders and actors and rock stars aren't gay because of a penis thing. They want lots of other men to look at them. The guy who developed his sense of fashion and various pleasantries is probably emulating someone like Martha Stewart. Penises are a means to an end. That's why some gays decide they'd rather chop it off in the quest of being a real woman.

            So gays think in their head they don't have penises?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >So gays think in their head they don't have penises?
            They have abnormal psychosexual differentiation. Of course they know certain facts but don't see how those add up to some obvious heterosexual outcome. The same is true for the heterosexual man who could never see how gay sex is a correct conclusion. But he orients himself to being a man who finds union with a woman, even if he is not the most masculine. Likewise lots of gays are hyper masculine but it's so they can attract other men.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            If the Republic is indeed a sort of pro Sparta PTSD-Stockholm-syndrome cope then that changes everything.

            Plus Plato was gay. All his work needs to reevaluated under that lense now that we understand gay psychology.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            The famous gay scene of symposium is a good start.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            The famous gay scene of symposium is a good start.

            He denounced homosexual activity later on, and even Lysis and especially Symposium he made it clear that giving into homosexualry is wrong. In Phaedrus, too.
            >the black horse is a blind homosexual lusting after power

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >the black horse is a blind homosexual lusting after power
            But why do gays lust for power?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            OP is some shade of brown and can't read, what the herculaneum papyri revealed was that Plato was a slave AND the specific place where he later died

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Was he sold into slavery by Dionysus in Sicily or was he taken by the Spartans after they conquered Aegina?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            nta I'm guessing the latter.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            idk the details but as for slavery they are saying the papyri claim the latter, but the big news is the details about the specific burying place, which beforehand was just know as the Academy itself, but now apparently has the specific spot

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            If the Republic is indeed a sort of pro Sparta PTSD-Stockholm-syndrome cope then that changes everything.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            The common version of the tale is that Plato was eventually bought by Anniceris, a philosopher from Cyrene, who freed him and helped him return to Athens.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            He was an aristocrat, anon. Most likely a Spartan officer had him as a guest in his house, he probably spent his years as a teacher to young Spartans. There wouldn't be a shortage of people willing to pay the money to free him.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        No, he wrote The Republic in the 4th century BC, decades after his enslavement.

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    What difference does it make if he died as a slave? Why do people find the tiniest most pathetic excuse to “own” or embarrass authors on here? Same with that one Schopenhauer image where his mom was upset with him, how is that inherently detrimental to his character and works in any way?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >spends hundreds of pages exhorting the student to a life of ascetic willlessness
      >annoy your mother with your attitude

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        His mom was a c**t, the more I read about her the more she reminds me of my own mom. She’s terrified at the prospect of him questioning things and going his own way, she wants him under her control. My mom says the same shit and im nowhere near as accomplished or existential as him. My mom is a hyper dogmatic Muslim who seethes anytime I don’t immediately align with what she believes. Ultimately this is how most vile miserable women express their feelings, not by saying “I don’t like that you do x” but by instead trying to shame their entire character into submission her letter reads like that method to a T.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >questioning things and going his own way
          It is not very willless of him not to resign his will to her control.

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Until the text gets published, it's a strange claim to make. Plato scholars wouldn't be surprised to hear another variation of the story of being sold as a slave, shared in both Plutarch and Diogenes Laërtius, but they would be surprised to hear of it at 404-399, when Plato was still in the city observing his family members in the oligarchy of 404-403, and 399 when he was able to go to Socrates' trial, and have enough wealth to suggest he would front Socrates money to pay a fine.

    What might getting confused, let me quote from Plutarch's Life of Dion:

    >At this meeting the general subject was human virtue, and most of the discussion turned upon manliness. And when Plato set forth that tyrants least of all men had this quality, and then, treating of justice, maintained that the life of the just was blessed, while that of the unjust was wretched, the tyrant, as if convicted by his arguments, would not listen to them, and was vexed with the audience because they admired speaker and were charmed by his utterances. At last he got exceedingly angry and asked the philosopher why he had come to Sicily. And when Plato said that he was come to seek a virtuous man, the tyrant answered and said: “Well, by the gods, it appears that you have not yet found such an one.” Dion thought that this was the end of his anger, and as Plato was eager for it, sent him away upon a trireme, which was conveying Pollis the Spartan to Greece. But Dionysius privily requested Pollis to kill Plato on the voyage, if it were in any way possible, but if not, at all events to sell him into slavery; for he would take no harm, but would be quite as happy, being a just man, even if he should become a slave. Pollis, therefore, as we are told, carried Plato to Aegina and there sold him; for the Aeginetans were at war with the Athenians and had made a decree that any Athenian taken on the island should be put up for sale.

    So whether the scholars reading Philodemus are getting confused by something, Plutarch's story already has connections between a Spartan and Aegina, and has it placed during Dionysius the elder's reign. We won’t be able to tell how these people are coming to these conclusions until they publish.

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    one problem - Pompeii and Herculaneum were buried in 1631, not 79 AD

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *