So how exactly does the caste system work? And why did it only emerge in India?

So how exactly does the caste system work? And why did it only emerge in India?

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Other places like Spanish Colonial America and Japan had a caste system too. India just had the most strict and harsh system and was often religiously backed.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >So how exactly does the caste system work?
    Your entire life is laid out for you from birth.
    >And why did it only emerge in India?
    It didn't. Plenty of other places had caste systems. It's just most well preserved in India. Mexico once had a caste system but weak institutions allowed it to fall apart or at least not be enforced properly.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      So does caste equal class? Like, if you're a brahmin, you have access to wealth whereas dalits don't?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Caste is a class into which you are born

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          And that dictates wealth, right?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            The higher the caste, the more wealthy, usually. In my observation, this is a phenomenon that occurs with very high population density. Naturally, the more population dense is a community, the more stratified are they socially. Well, the most stratified you can possibly be is a caste system, and it is something I have observed in the rice growing regions of South and East Asia.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Do you think the caste system will ever go away?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            They have no reason to make it go away unless something catastrophic occurs. Consider the British conquest of India was not enough to break that system.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Class implies social upwards/downwards mobility. Poorgays becoming richgays is possible. Lower caste becoming upper caste (whether by marriage or prestige) is almost unheard of.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          So are all upper caste people rich?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            You could conceivably be poor by making bad decisions. Caste is your blood. Here's a parallel: Ancient Rome had plebs and patricians; this was a caste system of sorts; eventually, the laws were changed to allow plebs all sorts of rights, but that was a gradual process, and blue blood was still valuable. Well, Pompey was a pleb: it did not matter how powerful or rich he became, he was a pleb. Conversely, Caesar was a patrician; in fact, his blood was about as blue as could be; but he was impoverished until he embarked upon his wars of conquest. But no matter how poor he was at any given time, he was always a patrician.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >his blood was about as blue as could be
            I would argue the gentes who joined Rome under Romulus and Numa Pompilius had bluer blood.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >well akshually

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >shilling for an albalongan rube

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Most are. But if you're upper caste and you, say, become poor by making moronic financial decisions then you're still considered to be above dalits.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Not automatically, but wealth tends to pile up when others have institutionally all the chips stacked up for them, while others have all chips stacked up against them.

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Tokugawa Japan was a caste system

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It existed everywhere.
    India were just the ones who made a religion out of it.
    In Europe you couldn't (legally) marry those dirty non-frees.
    Brain hurt too much to give further examples but maybe when I come back in few hours.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The Vimana Aryan gaylords brought it

    • 4 weeks ago
      Schizoidberg

      That's a Merkabah, not a Vimana.

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The Caste system can be divided into two parts Jati and Varna. Jati is your clan/sub-ethnic group; it's your community that you rely upon. The community of people you will marry and be friends with. The group of people that you will interact with for most of your life. The Varna system refers to your divinely ordained social class within a traditional Hindu society (which was originally based on intrinsic nature/personality or Gunas in Vedic science). Varna is your occupation, requirements and duties, or Dharma that you have to do for the rest of your life. Now, the Varna system began to be hereditary by 100BCE (as by this time Jatis started to form [according to genetic evidence]).
    (1/3)

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The Varna system is an extreme form of division of labor; as you're expected to be specialized in one occupation. Your expected to follow certain laws/rituals. If you break these rules or are specialized in multiple things or are self sufficient, you will be seen as unclean and barbaric. Because, a Hindus dharma is to follow there role in the Hindu society's division of labor so, breaking it disrupts the dharma of other people as your disrupting the divinely ordained division of labor. It is seen as a bad thing in Hindu society to wash your own plates or take care of your appearance as, those roles are meant for people who have a Varna specialized in those occupations. The Varna system is a form of learned helplessness. You have a population of deskilled people where most of them are unable to defend themselves or survive without others. You have a population that is heavily reliant on social hierarchy/state structures so, they are very eager to follow there conqueror. And Btw this system has also seeped into other religions of the sub continent (like Christianity and Islam).
      (2/3)

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        If you want to be a brahman (i.e. teacher, priest, manager, etc...) you have to be vegetarian. You'll need to go through the Upanayana to be a Brahman. Mind you if your not a brahman then you can't read the Vedas in orthodox Hinduism. If you want to be a Kshatriya (i.e. Police officer, military, security, etc...) you have to learn how to fight. You are the only varna allowed to own a weapon/know self defense. You can also eat meat. If you want to be a Vaishya (i.e. business owner, bankster, moneylender, finance worker, ect...) you need to want to work with money. You're the only varna allowed to own a business. It's recommended to be vegetarian but not required. This is the same for shudras too. Vaishyas can't work with there hands as that is for shudras(artisan/workers). Shudras are not allowed to own what they work as that is for the Vaishyas. So you can't be a small business owner in Orthodox Hinduism. Also if you are Brahman, Kshatriya or Vaishya it's recommended that you have a shudra be your servant to do the house work. If you do the house work by yourself as a Brahman, Kshatriya or Vaishya you'll be seen as breaking the dharma of your varna/seen as unclean so it's not recommended in Orthodox circles.
        (3/3)

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >The Varna system refers to your divinely ordained social class within a traditional Hindu society (which was originally based on intrinsic nature/personality or Gunas in Vedic science).
      Post the scriptural passages that relate Gunas to castes?

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    India paved the way

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Caste systemcisn't even real. Dalits, brahmins, shudras, whatever the frick. They all change every other day. A dalit could claim to be brahmin and morons in India would be like 'ah I always knew you were one of us laddie boy'. It's all bullshit.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Caste systemcisn't even real.
      Cope. They are spreading it to the West like the islamists are spreading their Sharia.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Shut up b***h! Real homie talkin!

      • 4 weeks ago
        Schizoidberg

        That's hilarious. I hope it catches on. Seattle is full of dirty chandalas anyway.

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Is there any truth to dalits being considered 'untouchable' due to dealing with waste and dead animals? Or is thay just brahmin copium?

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Do you guys think Indian-Americans deserve to complain about racism when they come from upper caste families? Seems weird to cry about people calling you pajeet meanwhile your parents owned 50 dalit slaves back home.

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    >The Varna system refers to your divinely ordained social class within a traditional Hindu society (which was originally based on intrinsic nature/personality or Gunas in Vedic science).
    Post the scriptural passages that relate Gunas to castes?

    NTA but here you go:

    Rigveda (Purushasukta Verse 12) speaks about how different Varnas are nothing but designations for different Svabhavas of people by symbolically describing different Varnas as emerging from different limbs of Purusha (Brahman). In this verse, Rigveda employs the model of the human body to describe a conception of human society rooted in Svabhava and Svadharma in an organic manner.

    Manu Smriti (1.87) describes about how Brahman allotted different Svadharmas (personal duties) to people born with different Svabhavas (inherent nature).

    Similarly, Bhagavad Gita also speaks about creation of four Varnas based on Guna (natural qualities and tendencies) and Karma (personal duties) (4.13) and that the duties have been allotted based on the Gunas that arise from Svabhava (18.41).

    Bhagavata Purana (11.17.13) stresses that the four Varna’s that originated from the Supreme Purusha are to be recognized/designated by their Atma-achara (natural activities or personal duties according to inherent nature i.e. Svadharma).

    Mahabharata (12.188) assigns a color to each Varna that symbolically represents the attributes/Svabhava associated with that Varna, reflecting the three qualities of the nature (Prakriti): Sattva, Rajas, and Tamas.

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