the image that broke

the image that broke IQfy

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    this list was a favorite of mine between the ages of 10-15, but no longer.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      puffed up, ephemeral

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous
  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Why did he hate on Joseph Conrad so much more than other writers? Was it just because he was highly regarded at the time and Nabakov just loved being a contrarian?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      It's because Conrad said that he didn't care for Anna Karenina

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      From the book cut up by that wiki page:

      >>Is it true that you have called Hemingway and Conrad “writers of books for boys”?
      >That’s exactly what they are. Hemingway is certainly the better of the two; he has at least a voice of his own and is responsible for that delightful, highly artistic short story, “The Killers.” And the description of the iridescent fish and rhythmic urination in his famous fish story is superb. But I cannot abide Conrad’s souvenir-shop style, bottled ships and shell necklaces of romanticist clichés. In neither of those two writers can I find anything that I would care to have written myself. In mentality and emotion, they are hopelessly juvenile, and the same can be said of some other beloved authors, the pets of the common room, the consolation and support of graduate students, such as—but some are still alive, and I hate to hurt living old boys while the dead ones are not yet buried.

      of your mastery of our language, you are frequently compared with Joseph Conrad.
      >Well, I’ll put it this way. When a boy, I was a voracious reader, as all boy writers seem to be, and between 8 and 14 I used to enjoy tremendously the romantic productions—romantic in the large sense—of such people as Conan Doyle, Kipling, Joseph Conrad, Chesterton, Oscar Wilde, and other authors who are essentially writers for very young people. But as I have well said somewhere before, I differ from Joseph Conradically. First of all, he had not been writing in his native tongue before he became an English writer, and secondly, I cannot stand today his polished clichés and primitive clashes. He once wrote that he preferred Mrs. Garnett’s translation of Anna Karenin to the original! This makes one dream—“ça fait rêver” as Flaubert used to say when faced with some abysmal stupidity. [...]

      Several times he compares Conrad unfavorably to H. G. Wells, whom Nabokov loved.

      I get the impression that he rags on Conrad especially because he used to like him (the cringe impulse) and because they're often compared. The core of his dislike is genuine and unforced but those circumstances easily breed a fixation. (That's just a guess though.)

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >But as I have well said somewhere before, I differ from Joseph Conradically.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >filtered by Celine

    oh dear..

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Joyce: an immense genius, unparalleled
    >hates two of three of his works

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      That isn't any kind of contradiction.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    This is single greatest image posted on IQfy since the DFW interview screenshot spam.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I agree with most except for Faulkner, Dostoevsky and Updike.

    That said, I will say that neither of the former two are "favorites". Updike is utter tripe, though. His books are either a. basketball or b. woman (the object). Literal Black person literature, in my opinion.

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >The Brothers Karamazov. Dislike it intensely.
    Yup, IQfy got broken alright.

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    >Lewis Carroll
    >One would like to have filmed his picnics.

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    russians are so hateful and weird

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    If Nabokov was alive now he'd be shitting up threads with his autism lmao. Also:
    >Finnegan's Wake
    >Conventional

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >One would like to have filmed him...
    I get what he means, but could he have expressed it in a less autistic way? But yes, to see Melville feed a sardine to a cat, lol.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      He didn't express it in exactly that way

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Shakespeare in the part of the King's Ghost sounds kino ngl.

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    you forgot to reverse the name order for yury olesha

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    How is Doctor Zhivago pro-bolshevist? I have seen the movie and it was extremely anti-bolshevist, depicting them as neurotic, resentful cucks. Is the film the opposite of the novel?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Doctor Zhivago
      i just bought that book the other day and have no idea what its about

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        The main guy in the movie is almost politically neutral, leaning towards being pro-tsarist and is the ultimate gigachad, whilst the main bolshevik character is a literal cuck, impotent, resentful, motivated only by hatred and revenge: the rightwing stereotype of a leftist basedboy. I have heard that the author of the novel wrote it as some sort of revenge against Stalin who had some of his friends killed. He won the nobel prize. But I think the reason for the book winning the nobel prize was largely political: because it dabbed so hard on commies and portrayed capitalists as ultra-masculine.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          i can't imagine any real commie being offended by people dabbing on fashy bolshevik scum

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >fashy bolshevik scum
            Go back to Twitter until you are of age, this is an adult website

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            your troony discord for leninist circlejerking isn't here pal

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >unironically says "dabbing" and "fashy"
            >accuses other people of being discord trannies
            extreme projection

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >unironically says "dabbing"
            ?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Like I said, please leave this website until you are 18, it is not for children.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            *dab*

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous
    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      According to Nabokov
      >Any intelligent Russian would see at once that the book is pro-Bolshevist and historically false, if only because it ignores the Liberal Revolution of spring, 1917, while making the saintly doctor accept with delirious joy the Bolshevist coup d’état seven months later—all of which is in keeping with the party line.
      Notable context is that Nabokov's father was involved in the provisional government after the February Revolution, went into exile after the October revolution, and was ultimately killed by a tsarist. So he must have taken personal offense at that simplification.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        However, doctor Zhivago is presented as a naive young man who slowly by witnessing the horrors of idealism being actualized becomes disillusioned. That to me seems to be the reason why he felt delirious joy at the coup d’état, since being naive as he was he thought that it was going to lead to Russia becoming a more fair, equal society.

        But now that I read more of the interview you just posted I see that what Nabokov has an issue with is that the book presents the idea that the country was heading in the right direction under Lenin and that it was only because the revolution was corrupted by Stalin that things went awry. And Nabokov thought that things were shit already from the start. But I didn't really get the impression that it was that at all. I thought Zhivago was about a naive young man becoming disillusioned with youthful, passionate idealism.

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    he really like lewis carroll wonder why he didn't also list whitman who he definitely also adored and with whom he shared affinities

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Whitman wasn't a pedo.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        neither was nabakov 😉

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Neither was Lewis Carroll 😉

  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    this whole list basically

  16. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Fruedian interpretation of dreams is charlatanic, and satanic, nonsense.
    Lmao true. Freudcels BTFO

  17. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I love reading artistic geniuses insult and degrade other artistic geniuses. Doesn't matter what medium; reading Tarkovsky tear into just about every other great director (except Bergman and Bresson) is a pure joy.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      He also liked Kurosawa right? I remember having watched some video where one of them recalled them having got drunk together and gone to a bar where they both drunkenly sang the theme from Seven Samurai together.

  18. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    King, Stephen. A favorite between the ages of 14 and 40, and thereafter. If you know, you know. Second only to John Grisham.

  19. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Beckett: author of wretched plays
    YES THANK YOU. No idea what people find enjoyable in those awful things

  20. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    McCarthy, Cormac.
    Blood Meridian. A cruel and crude new book.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Blood Meridian, a favorite between lit '16-'21, but no longer.

  21. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    Whether he got off to it is beside the point, the man was absolutely fascinated with pedophilia. Most of his novels either have pedophilic characters or allude to it in some way.
    It's fricking ridiculous, in his magnum opus "Ada" virtually every other character is either a child molester or has been molested as a child.

  22. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    At first I thought he was just being overly critical but then he seemed to like Kafka so now I think he's based.

  23. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    nasty rigarmarole

  24. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >not a good translator
    Reminds me of that guy

  25. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >at his worst, he is a worthless writer; at his best, he is incomparable and inimitable
    >am depressed by his inability to describe young women.
    Going to read Gogol now

  26. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Praise of James Joyce and workd like Ulysses is just a very extensive meme right?

  27. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    What exactly constitutes fraud in the world of fiction?

  28. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    There are some hot tales here but I agree with his list more than I disagree with it

  29. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    his critical dismissiveness reminds me of Scaruffi

  30. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    The Borges one needs to be updated. That was before he delved well into his work. After actually reading most of it he said:
    >At first Vera and I were delighted at reading Borges. We felt like we were on the portico of a great house. Then we realized there was no house.

  31. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I have now integrated these opinions into my own
    prepare to be called moronic if you disagree with this list

  32. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I'm reading Speak, Memory and he just mentioned "the writer Dostoevski, author of The Double, etc." He's so fricking petty

  33. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Queneau
    >Excercises du Style
    >A thrilling masterpiece, one of the greatest stories in French literature

    what is he on about?I love 'Excercises', but 'greatest story' doesn't make sense at all

  34. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    What's wrong with young people? Appealing to the boomer equivalent parasites of any generation will never be a virtue.

  35. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    It has good and bad takes. For example, Ilf and Petrov are indeed excellent writers, while his take on Faulkner seems childish and ignorant.

  36. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    spot on with dostoevsky

  37. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >reviews 5 germans
    >only likes kafka
    really makes one think

  38. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Comments on Tolstoy
    >No Hadji murat
    hmmm

  39. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Wtf Nabokov is just like me

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