What is the best study bible for catholics? English version only.

What is the best study bible for catholics?
English version only.

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Oooo look at the cute little kitty basking in the sun :O

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It’s me :3

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Ignatius Study Bible
    as far as I know

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      is there a study version for the jerusalem translation?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        you probably want new jerusalem as it's translated from the original sources (and the few occasions of "non-sexist" stuff is clearly marked), the jerusalem is not
        1985, re-edited in 1990... can't fine it on annas archive but is on archive.org

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The Didache Bible is the single best all readers one volume Catholic Bible edition. Has everything Ignatius has but with the addition of excellent intros for each book.

      Say it with me anon,

      The Didache Bible is the single best all around Catholic Bible

      Ready? Let's say it again,

      The Didache Bible is the single best all around Catholic Bible

      One more time,

      The Didache Bible is the single best all around Catholic Bible

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        https://i.imgur.com/QlYc9g4.jpg

        top right probably

        you probably want new jerusalem as it's translated from the original sources (and the few occasions of "non-sexist" stuff is clearly marked), the jerusalem is not
        1985, re-edited in 1990... can't fine it on annas archive but is on archive.org

        Here's why the Didache Bible is better than the JSB:
        - Didache uses the RSV(-2CE) translation, which is more standard while being theologically fine.
        - Didache has intros for each book. JSB has introductions for sections (it doesn't have introductions for each book of the Pentateuch).
        - The Didache commentary has wider guidance, while the JSB is more focused on narrower scholarly views. Compare Gen 1:1 for both editions:

        (cont)

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >Didache Bible
          1—3 The story of creation presents eternal truths about God and humanity and about the nature and significance of creation. Creation takes on the powerful significance that man and woman are created in the image and likeness of God. Furthermore, through the violation of God's Law, the first human beings, Adam and Eve, brought sin into the world. Hence, Genesis marks the beginning of salvation history; a history that will be completed at the end of time as related in the final chapters of Revelation. While the Church looks at the literal sense and meaning of the creation story, i.e., the meaning conveyed by the words, it does not require a literalistic approach as if the purpose of God's Revelation were to provide a scientific explanation of the universe, nor is it opposed to various scientific theories as long as the divine origin of creation and God's plan and providence are not denied. Faith and science, in the Genesis story, complement each other, and there is ample room for modern scientific enquiry and explanation that is compatible with God being the ultimate cause of the created world. (CCC 121-123, 128-130 , 199 , 280, 289, 337-354 ; CSDC 451)
          1:1 In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth: This simple statement that initiates the first book of the Old Testament reveals that God is eternal, i.e., his existence transcends time, and all time is eternally present for him. Second, God is omnipotent. Everything that exists originated with him. By his Word, he brought all of creation into existence without the use of pre-existing materials. Finally, God alone is the Creator, and he has authority over all creation. We affirm God as Father and omnipotent Creator when we pray the first lines of both the Nicene Creed and the Apostles' Creed. (CCC 268, 279-280, 290-295 )

          The Didache offers a more complete and full explanation of the first verse, and includes strong reminders of of how it relates to religious belief, daily practice (the creed prayers) and how it relates to our overall understanding about existence.

          (cont)

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >JSB
            1 a. This narrative. ascribed to the 'Priestly' source, Js less concrete and more theological than that which follows. 2:4-25 : it aims at a logical and exhaustive classi· fication of beings whose creation is deliberately fitted into the framework of a week which closes with the sabbath day of rest. These beings come forth from nothing at God's command : they emerge in order of dignity: man.. God's image and creation's king, comes last. The text makes use of tbe Primitive science of Its day. It would be a mistake to seek points of agreement between this schematic presentation and the data of modem science, but it is Important to notice that although it bears the stamP of its period this literary form conveys a revelation of one. transcendent God, existing before the world which be created-a revelation valid for all time.

            This is stuffier, more fixed on narrow text studies of the Bible, and lacks the meaningful practical commentary that the Didache Bible offers. It also calls the Bible's understanding of science primitive, which the Didache is more well rounded at addressing, since it logical and open about it.

            With both compared at the editorial material and direct verse level, the Didache Bible is the clear better choice, and the best general Catholic study Bible overall.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >Didache Bible
          1—3 The story of creation presents eternal truths about God and humanity and about the nature and significance of creation. Creation takes on the powerful significance that man and woman are created in the image and likeness of God. Furthermore, through the violation of God's Law, the first human beings, Adam and Eve, brought sin into the world. Hence, Genesis marks the beginning of salvation history; a history that will be completed at the end of time as related in the final chapters of Revelation. While the Church looks at the literal sense and meaning of the creation story, i.e., the meaning conveyed by the words, it does not require a literalistic approach as if the purpose of God's Revelation were to provide a scientific explanation of the universe, nor is it opposed to various scientific theories as long as the divine origin of creation and God's plan and providence are not denied. Faith and science, in the Genesis story, complement each other, and there is ample room for modern scientific enquiry and explanation that is compatible with God being the ultimate cause of the created world. (CCC 121-123, 128-130 , 199 , 280, 289, 337-354 ; CSDC 451)
          1:1 In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth: This simple statement that initiates the first book of the Old Testament reveals that God is eternal, i.e., his existence transcends time, and all time is eternally present for him. Second, God is omnipotent. Everything that exists originated with him. By his Word, he brought all of creation into existence without the use of pre-existing materials. Finally, God alone is the Creator, and he has authority over all creation. We affirm God as Father and omnipotent Creator when we pray the first lines of both the Nicene Creed and the Apostles' Creed. (CCC 268, 279-280, 290-295 )

          The Didache offers a more complete and full explanation of the first verse, and includes strong reminders of of how it relates to religious belief, daily practice (the creed prayers) and how it relates to our overall understanding about existence.

          (cont)

          >JSB
          1 a. This narrative. ascribed to the 'Priestly' source, Js less concrete and more theological than that which follows. 2:4-25 : it aims at a logical and exhaustive classi· fication of beings whose creation is deliberately fitted into the framework of a week which closes with the sabbath day of rest. These beings come forth from nothing at God's command : they emerge in order of dignity: man.. God's image and creation's king, comes last. The text makes use of tbe Primitive science of Its day. It would be a mistake to seek points of agreement between this schematic presentation and the data of modem science, but it is Important to notice that although it bears the stamP of its period this literary form conveys a revelation of one. transcendent God, existing before the world which be created-a revelation valid for all time.

          This is stuffier, more fixed on narrow text studies of the Bible, and lacks the meaningful practical commentary that the Didache Bible offers. It also calls the Bible's understanding of science primitive, which the Didache is more well rounded at addressing, since it logical and open about it.

          With both compared at the editorial material and direct verse level, the Didache Bible is the clear better choice, and the best general Catholic study Bible overall.

          >confused JSB with NJB
          the rest is cope

          btw while the NJB quote you gave is cope, at least it doesn't go into speculation ~ while still being approved and promoted by Catholic authorities
          I happen to have read some very deep israeli speculation on what you quote yet prefer what you mark as JSB (should be NJB...): dry, but does not hit you over the head... allows freedom, affords free will... wasn't that what Jesus Christ gave his Life for?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I didnt confuse them. I posted about the JSB because that digital edition is reachable.

            If you have the NJB study edition, post it, then explain why it isn't the standard English translation, and how its editorial material compares to the Didache Bible.

            Ignatius Study Bible (but only has the New Testament)
            and
            Navarre Bible

            Ignatius lacks the intros that the Didache has.
            The Navarre Bible is good but is big: It's two shelves of volumes.

            IQ below 85: NJB
            85-115: Didache or whatever flavor of the day the gays and communists prefer
            IQ above 115: NJB

            This is a Catholic thread sir, the Didache Bible is published by a faithful and trusted Catholic publisher.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >If you have the NJB study edition, post it, then explain why it isn't the standard English translation
            the commentary on 1:1 is the same but I don't have access to the JSB so I can't verify what you say is true
            it's available on archive.org, I have the one with flying Jesus on the cover

            >This is a Catholic thread sir, the Didache Bible is published by a faithful and trusted Catholic publisher.
            I don't trust the Catechism and the Didache takes pride in it
            I consider that Catechism is digging the grave of Catholicism, making the same errors as Eastern Orthodoxy: so basically becoming a second-hand Eastern Orthodoxy
            which is unacceptable and contrary to the things decided at the Council of Nicaea
            it's bad enough that Catholics are singing hymns instead of the Psalms

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            The catechisms before Vatican II (Vatican II was when the papacy was hijacked but still technically legitimate) were more theologically coherent. I agree contemporary documents published as catechisms leave too much room for disagreement.

            I did not detect anything wrong with the Didache, but if you can show an example where it steers faith heretically, I will take not and investigate. Any problematic book I will not recommend.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            yes, I know it all went to shit with Vatican II but you also need to understand that it was worked on by people paid by the hour ever since the Baroque
            the Baroque was a mistake... they got teased (or dragged) into something they should have ignored
            they should have steamrolled the damned protestants

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Why didn't Orthodoxes steamroll the peripheral Muslims? Why is Constantinople in Muslim hands?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            To clarify I'm not trying to mock you. I don't know the history and capability of Orthodoxes at the time.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            you got it all wrong, I am a Catholic
            Orthodoxes became a branch of their national governments (e.g. Russian Orthodox is a branch of the Russian Government, Romanian Orthodox of the Romanian Government) which is much worse than Catholicism even though since Vatican II they (we?) embraced nationalism also and abandoned the lingua franca
            Orthodoxes were also contaminated by Hindu stuff as early as the gypsy migrations (17 or 18 century, can't remember now, frick gypsies) the echoes of which you can see in their countries: they literally worship gypsies and behave like gypsies
            as for Constantinople and Muslims, I wouldn't worry so much; the problem with Muslims is not Turks, Afghans, Pakis, or Persians: it's Arabs... if you look at the history if Islaam, you will see that it all went decently until Arabs (via the British) got their paws on it
            anyway
            may Jesus Christ be praised

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          https://i.imgur.com/NTNOlhh.jpg

          The Didache Bible is the single best all readers one volume Catholic Bible edition. Has everything Ignatius has but with the addition of excellent intros for each book.

          Say it with me anon,

          The Didache Bible is the single best all around Catholic Bible

          Ready? Let's say it again,

          The Didache Bible is the single best all around Catholic Bible

          One more time,

          The Didache Bible is the single best all around Catholic Bible

          >Didache Bible
          1—3 The story of creation presents eternal truths about God and humanity and about the nature and significance of creation. Creation takes on the powerful significance that man and woman are created in the image and likeness of God. Furthermore, through the violation of God's Law, the first human beings, Adam and Eve, brought sin into the world. Hence, Genesis marks the beginning of salvation history; a history that will be completed at the end of time as related in the final chapters of Revelation. While the Church looks at the literal sense and meaning of the creation story, i.e., the meaning conveyed by the words, it does not require a literalistic approach as if the purpose of God's Revelation were to provide a scientific explanation of the universe, nor is it opposed to various scientific theories as long as the divine origin of creation and God's plan and providence are not denied. Faith and science, in the Genesis story, complement each other, and there is ample room for modern scientific enquiry and explanation that is compatible with God being the ultimate cause of the created world. (CCC 121-123, 128-130 , 199 , 280, 289, 337-354 ; CSDC 451)
          1:1 In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth: This simple statement that initiates the first book of the Old Testament reveals that God is eternal, i.e., his existence transcends time, and all time is eternally present for him. Second, God is omnipotent. Everything that exists originated with him. By his Word, he brought all of creation into existence without the use of pre-existing materials. Finally, God alone is the Creator, and he has authority over all creation. We affirm God as Father and omnipotent Creator when we pray the first lines of both the Nicene Creed and the Apostles' Creed. (CCC 268, 279-280, 290-295 )

          The Didache offers a more complete and full explanation of the first verse, and includes strong reminders of of how it relates to religious belief, daily practice (the creed prayers) and how it relates to our overall understanding about existence.

          (cont)

          >JSB
          1 a. This narrative. ascribed to the 'Priestly' source, Js less concrete and more theological than that which follows. 2:4-25 : it aims at a logical and exhaustive classi· fication of beings whose creation is deliberately fitted into the framework of a week which closes with the sabbath day of rest. These beings come forth from nothing at God's command : they emerge in order of dignity: man.. God's image and creation's king, comes last. The text makes use of tbe Primitive science of Its day. It would be a mistake to seek points of agreement between this schematic presentation and the data of modem science, but it is Important to notice that although it bears the stamP of its period this literary form conveys a revelation of one. transcendent God, existing before the world which be created-a revelation valid for all time.

          This is stuffier, more fixed on narrow text studies of the Bible, and lacks the meaningful practical commentary that the Didache Bible offers. It also calls the Bible's understanding of science primitive, which the Didache is more well rounded at addressing, since it logical and open about it.

          With both compared at the editorial material and direct verse level, the Didache Bible is the clear better choice, and the best general Catholic study Bible overall.

          [...]
          [...]
          >confused JSB with NJB
          the rest is cope

          btw while the NJB quote you gave is cope, at least it doesn't go into speculation ~ while still being approved and promoted by Catholic authorities
          I happen to have read some very deep israeli speculation on what you quote yet prefer what you mark as JSB (should be NJB...): dry, but does not hit you over the head... allows freedom, affords free will... wasn't that what Jesus Christ gave his Life for?

          But it feels like a text book, literally.
          shiny green with a gloss finish
          and the pages are some kind of coated paper.
          Ignatius Press dropped the ball in that regard.
          I'll buy the paperback edition if it ever comes out and leave my green shiny one in storage.
          Ignatius should ask the art department at NYRB for some advice.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      this

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        RSVCE. Which I think Ignatius Study Bible in is an edition of too.

        I like the Didache Bible more. The Ignatius is a close second, since as pointed out, the study material is identical, but the Didache Bible has helpful introductions for each book, which the Ignatius doesn't.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          *is identical, except

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      RSVCE. Which I think Ignatius Study Bible in is an edition of too.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >catholic
    >reading the bible
    you are doing it wrong

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    top right probably

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Ignatius Study Bible (but only has the New Testament)
    and
    Navarre Bible

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    IQ below 85: NJB
    85-115: Didache or whatever flavor of the day the gays and communists prefer
    IQ above 115: NJB

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    hell son between 1000 and 1500 the Catholic Church accumulated enough munitions to annihilate even Godzilla... not to mention other stuff... but instead decide they instead want to dance with an prostitute that has a face that looks exactly like John Calvin?!

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    it's like the "war on terror" in the USA
    did the terrorists ever dreamed of destroying the USA by making the life of each citizen dreadfully boring and having each citizen humiliated every time they traveled by airplane?
    nah, it was an unforeseen success of cataclysmic proportions, the USA basically killed itself
    deja vu

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    im going didache

    whats the best reading order

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The resemblance is striking.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Huh? You're catholic. You don't need to read the Bible. Just attend a Latin mass.

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