When and why did chariots fall off? You stop hearing about them around the time of the romans I think

When and why did chariots fall off? You stop hearing about them around the time of the romans I think

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Horses got big enough that you could ride them directly

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      this is the real answer. You never actually hear cavalry and chariots fighting side by side, and thats because when cavalry became viable, chariots were no longer needed

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This.
      It took a long time for horses to be selectively bred to be strong enough to actually carry armored warriors in battle. Chariots were a workaround because horses just weren't hardy enough to be reliably ridden in combat.
      As the other anon said, they also only worked well if the terrain allowed it, otherwise you were just fricked.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This.
      It took a long time for horses to be selectively bred to be strong enough to actually carry armored warriors in battle. Chariots were a workaround because horses just weren't hardy enough to be reliably ridden in combat.
      As the other anon said, they also only worked well if the terrain allowed it, otherwise you were just fricked.

      Yamnaya rode horses. Steppe Eneolithic rode horses

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        this occurred after the Yamnaya, but the Yamnaya horses and the domesticated horses of the later Sintashta are definitely related.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        No.
        It's over, the horse meme is literally dead.

        >However, although there is overwhelming lexical evidence for domestication of horses, horse-drawn carriages, and derived mythologies in the Indo-Iranian branch of the Indo-European family, linguistic indications of horse-breeding practices at the deepest Proto-Indo-European level are in fact ambiguous42 (Supplementary Discussion). The limited presence of horses in CWC43 assemblages and the local genetic makeup of CWC specimens reject scenarios in which horses were the main driving force behind the initial spread of Indo-European languages in Europe44.

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The Battle of Gaugamela probably wasn't yje direct end to chariots but it did show how easy they were to counter. The basic summary is that while fighting Darius III in 331 BC, Alexander the Great ordered his troops to open their lines so that chariots would pass through them during attacks. The moment the chariot passes you, you shoot or stab their back. It showed chariots were only helpful in one direction during combat.

    The last use of a chariot by Romans (that historians know of) is in 83 AD during the Battle of Mons Graupius in Scotland. Chariots were just considered too bulky, making it harder ti hunt down the enemy's cavalry, especially in heavily forested areas.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    All of this proves the ineffectiveness of IE. they created something very problematic and useless in the long term.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      IE also invented horse riding.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    This probably happened back in the days of the Cimmerians (they were the first real horse riders).

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    British people were the last to use them in war against the Romans. Romans continued to use them for races but were surprised Britons still used them in battle. They were somewhat effective against Roman invasions but not enough.

    They were used to convey soldiers to and from the field of battle, not so much to charge the enemy down. A charioteer deposited the warrior in the fray, then held back a bit, then picked him up when he was tiring and took him away to recover before bringing him back to the battle.

    The Indo-Europeans did NOT have chariots. PIE people domesticated horses 5000+ years ago. They only had clunky 4 solid wood wheel wagons that had no military function. Catacomb culture invented two wheeled proto-chariots around 4500 years ago but those were too slow and heavy to be of much use either. Proto-Indo-Iranics in the South Ural Sintashta culture invented light, 2 spoked wheeled chariots around 4000 years ago. They spread from the South Urals into the rest of Europe and the Middle East.

    In short the chariot was in use for 2000 years. It had no role in the spread of Indo-European peoples except the Aryans who went to Iran and India around 1500 BC. All the other IE people spread long before chariots existed.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Proto-Indo-Iranics in the South Ural Sintashta culture invented light, 2 spoked wheeled chariots around 4000 years ago.
      lmao but you just confirmed that IE people literally invented war chariots.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        let me explain;
        The horse that was useful enough for cavalry only appeared in 1800 BC with the Syntashta, who consequently created the chariot. Before this, horses were not used in war or useful enough for riding. Dom2 is the ancestor of modern horses.
        This is fairly accepted, horses were not used as cavalry until very late. Even the chariots were mostly battle taxis, warriors would ride into battle and then dismount to fight on foot, as in Homer.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Chariots were basically useless

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >tanks with horse
      >useless

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The Battle of Gaugamela probably wasn't yje direct end to chariots but it did show how easy they were to counter. The basic summary is that while fighting Darius III in 331 BC, Alexander the Great ordered his troops to open their lines so that chariots would pass through them during attacks. The moment the chariot passes you, you shoot or stab their back. It showed chariots were only helpful in one direction during combat.

        The last use of a chariot by Romans (that historians know of) is in 83 AD during the Battle of Mons Graupius in Scotland. Chariots were just considered too bulky, making it harder ti hunt down the enemy's cavalry, especially in heavily forested areas.

        Useless

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I was very fricking surprised when I learned chariot racing is still a thing. Even though this might not technically be a chariot or whatever.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      imagine the smell

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >I'm going to misinterpret a book from someone else's religion in order to prove why that religion is wrong. Surely this will work the 90,000th time it has been tried...

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