Which is better? Classical or ecclesiastical Latin?

To me it’s ecclesiastical; “wenie weedy weaky” sounds kinda lame.

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    both are good
    just like Koine vs Byzantine

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Not really. Byzantine Greek was already the same as modern Greek and Koine Greek was in fact pretty much the same as Attic Greek, and the key problem here is that Ancient Greek has only one living descendant unlike Latin so we can really speak about actual continuity in the language unlike, again, with Latin.

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    However Kickero sounds better than Cheechero

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Church Latin has its uses but I do like how Classical Latin is "cleaner" and simple in the same way a Roman vs Gothic building is. You always know what a C is going to do in Classical Latin, but the Medieval is a bit more elaborate.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >sounds kinda lame
    You're probably saying it wrong.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    In terms of Pronunciation I prefer Classical overall. I particularly dislike how Ecclesiastical uses /ɲ/ for "gn".

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    What about Vulgar Latin?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I personally like Vulgar and Medieval Latin, mainly because it's easier to read.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Neither, other than how it's pronounced and natrually how words change in the later it's not really that different. If you can read Classical you can read Ecclesiastical

      Vulgar Latin is just Classical Latin

  7. 2 months ago
    ࿇ C Œ M G E N V S ࿇

    SO CALLED «ECCLESIASTICAL LATIN» IS ACTUALLY ITALIAN LATIN; IT IS ITALIANIZED LATIN, AND IT SOUNDS AWFUL.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >ITALIANIZED LATIN
      You mean the italian language? That's not the same as ecclesiastic latin, you moron.

      • 2 months ago
        ࿇ C Œ M G E N V S ࿇

        IF YOU ARE DUMB, PLEASE, DO NOT REPLY TO MY POSTS.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        He's angry but he has a point. Ecclesiastical Latin has a heavy modern Italian inflection. I don't think it's bad sounding, just different.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Ecclesiastical Latin has a heavy modern Italian inflection
          Yes, but he didn't just call it italianized latin, he called it italian latin. Too bad that italian latin is literally what the italian language is.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Italian language is Florentine Vulgate. There was written 'Italian' before Dante, but it was Sicilian, a cousin language.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I've wasted many hours on this and concluded that the simplified reconstructed pronunciation is the best. It's fully phonetical and lacks both the kraut vowel system that has no way to be real and this awful palatalization. You may read about it in here: https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scrittura_e_pronuncia_del_latino#Versione_semplificata
      But if you have to choose between just these two, choose Ecclesiastical as it is just more phonetic.

      Based linguistic cumgenius.

      https://i.imgur.com/03fN3Mr.jpg

      I know it's [β], not [b]; I just don't think IQfy has full unicode support.
      [...]
      [...]
      You are both incorrect.
      Ecclesiastical Latin refers to the Latin of the Catholic Church - Liturgical Latin. It uses an Italianate pronunciation (with a couple changes) because the Vatican is in Rome. Well... an enclave surrounded by Rome.

      Using your local pronunciation is just a local pronunciation. Doesn't really have a name. Danes will pronounce it like Danish, Spaniards like Spanish, etc.

      >Danes will pronounce it like Danish
      Not really, there's a more or less uniform standard in non-Romance Europe. Pretty much like Ecclesiastical but G is always IQfy and soft C is /ts/ and not /ch/.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >may read about it in here
        Though it doesn't mention that L was generally "dark" like in Romanian and Portuguese and S was retracted like in Castilian Spanish, unlike in Ecclesiastical and Italian.

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >baynee beedee beekee
    Fricking atrocious, Classical is better.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Neither ecclesiastical nor classical is like this.
      You're thinking of Spanish.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        That is what Ecclesiastical Latin sounds like in Spanish dude.

        • 2 months ago
          ࿇ C Œ M G E N V S ࿇

          Neither ecclesiastical nor classical is like this.
          You're thinking of Spanish.

          NEITHER OF YOU KNOW THE SPANISH LANGUAGE.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            I know it's [β], not [b]; I just don't think IQfy has full unicode support.

            That is what Ecclesiastical Latin sounds like in Spanish dude.

            You... You do realize that "Ecclesiastical Latin" isn't one language but is just "Latin pronounced using the phonology of some other language", right?

            You are both incorrect.
            Ecclesiastical Latin refers to the Latin of the Catholic Church - Liturgical Latin. It uses an Italianate pronunciation (with a couple changes) because the Vatican is in Rome. Well... an enclave surrounded by Rome.

            Using your local pronunciation is just a local pronunciation. Doesn't really have a name. Danes will pronounce it like Danish, Spaniards like Spanish, etc.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Using your local pronunciation is just a local pronunciation
            Yeah, that's Ecclesiastical Latin. If you're referring to some historical variety of Italian then that's some historical variety of Italian, and it's not what people mean when they say "Ecclesiastical Latin".

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            You're wrong.
            I didn't fricking mention Italian at all.
            I said Church Latin has an Italianate pronunciation (save for modified vowel sounds).

            This is true whether you visit a Catholic church in D.C., Buenos Aires, or Stockholm.

            The IQ of this board declines by the day.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >the language spoken in Rome at [point in the Medieval period]
            So Italian.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Who are you quoting?
            What the frick are you talking about?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >This is true whether you visit a Catholic church in D.C., Buenos Aires, or Stockholm.
            I have done this. The Latin spoken varies from place to place because the Church just tells people to read Latin according to their native tongue's pronunciation rules.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            It does not. The Catholic Church asserts a pronunciation on its parishioners. If you encounter someone not using the defined Ecclesiastical pronunciation, you have encountered an educated person.
            Catholic Priests are instructed what pronunciation to use. This is also the form most often taught in schools.

            The Coptic church uses Coptic, the late form of the Egyptian language, as their liturgical language; it has a pronunciation in flux. In the 1800s there was a talk of undoing the schism between Orthodox and Coptic churches. So they began to read Coptic letters as if they were Greek letters. Which is ridiculous.
            Pope Shenouda tried to undo this and worked with linguistics to reconstruct an older pronunciation. This is what is usually used, but you can still find people using a Hellenic pronunciation.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >you have encountered an educated person.
            uneducated*

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        You... You do realize that "Ecclesiastical Latin" isn't one language but is just "Latin pronounced using the phonology of some other language", right?

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Pronuntiatio classica optima est.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Proooonuuuuuntiiiiiaaaaaatiiiiiiiooooooi claaaaaaaaaassiiiiiicaaaaaaaaaaaaa oooooooptiiiiiiiimaaaaaaa eeeeeeest.
      bene, barbare

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        English not having vowel length built into its phonemic inventory and instead using coda conditions is crosslinguistically very rare. Most languages, Latin included as we're told so by Classical authors, include it as part of the vowel phoneme.

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Ask /clg/.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Classical sounds artificial

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