Who should I read if I love James Joyce?

Who should I read if I love James Joyce?
I've never bothered with Ulysses or Finnegans Wake but Joyce is probably my favourite author

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    All those 19th century French novelists.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Which novelists?

      >love Joyce
      >haven't read Ulysses
      okay, the Wake I get, but not Ulysses? What the frick is wrong with you? That's like saying you love The Velvet Underground but refuse to listen to their first album

      I am just too intimidated

      he's your favorite writer because of Dubliners (which is great, but not one of the greatest books of all time) and Portrait (which is absolutely dull and uninteresting)?

      Yes

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Flaubert probably but its pointless if you don't know French

        https://i.imgur.com/4zoKK14.jpeg

        Who should I read if I love James Joyce?
        I've never bothered with Ulysses or Finnegans Wake but Joyce is probably my favourite author

        Joyce read every word of Defoe, he liked Tolstoy (though you will imagine Tolstoy wouldn't like him), Shelley, Shakespeare, he was a huge advocate of Ibsen, he liked Jens Peter Jacobsen (never read him so couldn't vouch), Byron (actually gets beat up or something over it in Portrait)

        Ezra Pound and Yeats are the obvious choices to read because they are his peers and maybe the only ones at his level

        Infinite Jest

        Perhaps but couldn't be a more different aesthetic

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >pointless
          Yeah, thanks for reminding us that Flaubert's
          >imagery
          >characterization
          >dramatic structure
          >thematic exposition
          >prose style qua specific arrangement of word-concepts, rather than arrangement of sounds
          >humor
          >pathos
          etc., are all utterly mediocre.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            pointless is an overstatement but what makes the book special is completely untranslatable, and Joyce would never have rated Flaubert so highly if he didn't know French

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >what makes the book special is completely untranslatable
            I don't think sonic effects are the only thing that makes Flaubert special, even Joyce would not agree with you on that.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            The distinctness of a language can't be reduced to "sonic effects" lol.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            French and English are extremely similar grammatically though.

            https://i.imgur.com/DVLeuqN.jpeg

            >Ibsen

            This has been a big question mark for me ever since I got into Joyce. I've read Dubliners, Portrait, and Ulysses, and I know about almost all of the guys you mentioned, and have read them. But Ibsen seems to be the big guy that influenced Joyce a lot, yet has fallen out of favor among modern readers. I'm curious about him.

            Ibsen, much like Flaubert and Dostoevsky, was one of the standard-bearers of the psychological approach to literature. This was what ushered in stream-of-consciousness Modernism, along with Hemingway's inversion of it.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >French and English are extremely similar grammatically though.

            The languages work very differently. French language is "deep", far less words but they are very precise and go straight into the Middle Ages. English is more sprawling. French works translate into English worse than German or Russian. But this is my understanding

            https://i.imgur.com/DVLeuqN.jpeg

            >Ibsen

            This has been a big question mark for me ever since I got into Joyce. I've read Dubliners, Portrait, and Ulysses, and I know about almost all of the guys you mentioned, and have read them. But Ibsen seems to be the big guy that influenced Joyce a lot, yet has fallen out of favor among modern readers. I'm curious about him.

            I wasn't aware he had fallen out of favor. He's one of the greatest dramatists. But he's never been the kind of artist to inspire tremendous enthusiasm like Shakespeare or Beethoven

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Doesn't that directly work *against* the idea of Flaubert as the "mot juste" author? His options were more limited and thus his choices less significant?
            Anyway my point is just that Flaubert's precision (and brutal honesty, which I think is what Joyce probably cared most about) of observation of people, settings, situations, etc. is a huge part of what makes him special, not just the precision of the language itself.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Indeed, Flaubert could never hope to reach the genius of Joyce's special needs words such as:
            >Bababadalgharaghtakamminarronnkonnbronntonnerronntuonnthunnt-rovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoordenenthurnuk
            Or his playful neologisms about loudly lip-smacking that still marvel the average Redditoyce today:
            >Florry whispers to her. Whispering lovewords murmur liplapping loudly, poppysmic plopslop.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Ibsen

          This has been a big question mark for me ever since I got into Joyce. I've read Dubliners, Portrait, and Ulysses, and I know about almost all of the guys you mentioned, and have read them. But Ibsen seems to be the big guy that influenced Joyce a lot, yet has fallen out of favor among modern readers. I'm curious about him.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      19th century French novelists don't write schizophrenic word salads like Ulysses and Finnegans Wake.

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >love Joyce
    >haven't read Ulysses
    okay, the Wake I get, but not Ulysses? What the frick is wrong with you? That's like saying you love The Velvet Underground but refuse to listen to their first album

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah I mean you can love Joyce, but have him be your favorite author? Once you read a lot of Ulysses and FW the prior books almost become irrelevant

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Joyce is probably my favourite author
    >never bothered with Ulysses or Finnegans Wake
    can you please use better bait fisherman-san

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Chairman Mao's quotations

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    he's your favorite writer because of Dubliners (which is great, but not one of the greatest books of all time) and Portrait (which is absolutely dull and uninteresting)?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >portrait dull and boring
      Psued detected

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Filtered.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    My advice would be to bother with Ulysses.

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Ulysses and Finnegans wake

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Infinite Jest

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    e-girlta
    songs of a dead dreamer and grimscribe
    house of seven gables

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    The unfortunate Finnegans Wake is nothing but a formless and dull mass of phony folklore, a cold pudding of a book, a persistent snore in the next room, most aggravating to the insomniac I am. Moreover, I always detested regional literature full of quaint old-timers and imitated pronunciation. Finnegans Wake’s facade disguises a very conventional and drab tenement house, and only the infrequent snatches of heavenly intonations redeem it from utter insipidity. I know I am going to be excommunicated for this pronouncement.

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Moore's Voice of the Fire and Jerusalem.

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Try Frank O'Hara.

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Read the rest of Joyce's work

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Anatole France, don't repeat this secret to anyone

  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    How the actual frick can you say that he's your favorite writer without having read Ulysses beforehand? Joyce is a god amongst men, and that's an understatement.

  16. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    James Stephens

  17. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >I've never bothered with Ulysses or Finnegans Wake

    I take it you’ve read his earlier works then.

  18. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    read some fricking steamy hot brapp

  19. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Winesburg, Ohio

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