Who were the Sumerians?

Who were the Sumerians? Were they just a continuation of the Ubaidians, or were they a new people that moved into the region? A migratory people would explain how strongly places like Egypt adopted traits of Sumerian culture, since it could then be through another, later migration into Egypt, but where would they have come from originally?

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I don't know what their genetics were, but maybe they were indigenous iranian farmers

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Were they just a continuation of the Ubaidians, or were they a new people that moved into the region?
      Both.

      Mostly, but they had admixture with Natufians.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Any farmer, by default, has admixture with Natufians

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          even rice farmers from the far east? maize farmers from central americas? i know thats not what you meant im being a nitpicker

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          No, they don't, brainlet.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            They probably literally were the first farmers mate. And agriculture was mostly spread through migration, not as a diffusion of ideas

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Farming was developed across the Fertile Crescent. You are a moron.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            … yes, a Fertile Crescent that was almost entirely Natufian at the time, you spas, lmao. Also, it honestly probably only developed at a single site, such as Tell Abu Hureyra, and then quickly spread from there

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Nobody tell him

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >continuation of the ubaidians
    Sounds about right. The myths of sumeria often reference Eridu as the first city. They are defined as sumerian on the virtue of writing on tablets.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      also, they speak a very different language. the ubaidian substrate is still clearly distinguishable.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    They were Northeast Caucasian migrants and they belonged to haplogroup J.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >"Before recorded history the Sumerians moved into Babylonia from the South. they spoke a language which is somewhat common with Finnish and Turkish. They were neither Aryans nor Semites. The Semites wore thick hair and long beards; the Sumerians shaved both their heads and faces. These Sumerians overran southern Babylonia as far norh as Nippur and became the ruling race. They added the worship of their gods on top of the worship of the deities of the conquered sities, but the earlier elements of these local deities persisted even in Sumerian thought. As a result the shaved Sumerians picture their gods with hair and beards. After settling in Babylonia, the Sumerians developed a system of writing. It was at first hieroglyphic, like the Egytian system. Afterwards the Semites, who still controlled Kish and Agade in the north, and had been reinforced by people (Semites) from Arabia, adapted this writing to their own language. These pictures degenerated into symbols which we know as "cuneiform" characters -- all letters are made with wedge-shape characters.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    They came from Turkmenistan

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      oh ok

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Egyptians adopted nothing sumerian beyond some artifacts bearing some vague resembling motifs

    They could not influence the closer levantines where the earliest records are egyptian (abishemu obelisk)

    Or even the more closer elamites whose script post dates egyptians

    As for migrations, it's unthinkable. they couldn't assemble wooden planks into proper hulls to make sea faring which was first done by egyptians

    >"The world’s earliest known writing systems emerged at more or less the same time, around 3300 bc, in Egypt and Mesopotamia (today’s Iraq)."

    https://oi.uchicago.edu/research/publications/oimp/oimp-33-pyramids-origins-egyptian-civilization

    > "And recent finds at Abydos that have pushed back the date of writing in Egypt, making it contemporaneous with the Mesopotamian invention, further undermine the old assumption that writing arose in Egypt under Sumerian influence."

    https://oi.uchicago.edu/research/publications/oimp/oimp-32-visible-language-inventions-writing-ancient-middle-east-and

    >Although it was once thought that the idea of writing came to Egypt from Mesopotamia, recent discoveries indicate that writing arose first in Egypt."

    https://books.google.com.eg/books?id=lF78Max-h8MC&q=recent+discoveries+indicate+writing&redir_esc=y#v=snippet&q=recent%20discoveries%20indicate%20writing&f=false

    >and examples of writing in Egypt have been found that very well may pre-date the earliest writing from Mesopotamia."

    https://books.google.com.eg/books?id=jsWL_XJt-dMC&pg=PA71&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      True.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Eh, we know who lived there back then. Not many options, really. The Southern origin of Sumerians is unlikely. In the Copper Age the whole place was basically flooded with Caucasian and Iranian ancestry pulling everyone north (compared to Natufians).

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