Why don't we move large quantity of water in arid areas?

If green land creates oxygen and green land is created by water and humidity.

If we could create some seas in the middle of Sahara and other arid places as Middle east, Austrialia. wouldn't that create rain and humidity for nature?

Let's say we construct some nuclear power plants on the coast of Sahara, that can power some big pumps, and a pipe as gazprom constructed in Europe. till the middle of Sahara. and pump water from sea few years

If it would be big enough, wouldn't that create humidity and rain?

Mike Stoklasa's Worst Fan Shirt $21.68

Yakub: World's Greatest Dad Shirt $21.68

Mike Stoklasa's Worst Fan Shirt $21.68

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Or even better
    there are sea level places in Sahara.
    Just dig channels and water would be pumped by gravity from ocean

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      You can't beat Hadley cells. The water vapor will be pushed away. Even if you somehow manage to make it work, what would you do with all the salt that is being accumulated in those lakes? You will have to move it back to the ocean. Also, your best case scenario will create climate similar to India's, with unbearable humid heat.
      An easier approach would be to use electrolysis on sea water and let the hydrogen flow through pipes to the middle of the desert. There you burn it to create electricity and pure water to sustain desert cities.

      Those areas are close to the coast and would still need a mega project that is a million times more difficult than the digging of the Suez canal.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Or just pump sea water in one end of the sea, then pump briny water out the other side. That was easy.

        dont let the salt form

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        The Sahara used to be a forest. Didn't the Hadley cells operate back then?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          It wasn't a forest, but a grassland and a savannah. The Hadley cells tilt northwards and southwards throughout the ages, IIRC due to earth's axis "wobbling" like a spinning top. The Sahara will be green again in about 10000 years.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Sahara is at the same lattitudes as India or the Carribean, obviously there must be more to it.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >You can't beat Hadley cells.
        So how did India and parts of China cheat? After all, they are at the same latitudes as the northern desert belt.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Nature is quite like a video game. It's a zero sum game where speccing one point into trait "A" means you lose out on that point in trait "B".
          It balanced the Sahara and India out.
          >Sahara
          It's a worthless plot of sand with a few Touareg and Arabs in it.
          >India
          Infested with Jeets.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Hadley cells don't matter for a climate that is bootstrapped up from the local geographical conditions, dipshit.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Except then you would be salting the entire stretch of earth you channeled through.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    you're a genius. get started and report back.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The main reason why Sahara is desert is because there is little rain falling the area. The reason why rain does not fall in area is because it is very hot there and clouds are vaporized due to the heat. In turn, it is very hot in area because there is no evaporation in the area. As you can see there is a cycle. The artificial seas would have a cooling effect on environment, which would bring rain into the desert allowing plants to grow in there.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >create inland sea
    >dries up within a year
    Wat nou?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      there are places at sea level, maybe with an artificial river from the ocean, you could have a constant sea. if it dries from temperature, it creates rain and humidity.

      >what are you going to do with the salt?

      by evaporation it cleans itself from salt

      it evaporates, and rains all over the Desert, near or far.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >by evaporation it cleans itself from salt

        Yes, it does. But the salt stays there, and it accumulates. And there's quite a lot of salt in seawater. You couldn't pump in 30 times the reservoir's volume before it completely fills with salt.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          So you sell the excess salt in bulk to icy municipalities who need to treat their roads since there have been salt shortages recently to the point some are already resorting to sand instead of salt.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Why don't we move large quantity of water in arid areas?
      In a nut shell, the cost of energy/electricity along with all the other problems associated with large mega projects.

      If you've got abundant, very, very cheap energy you can run desalination plants and pumps non-stop.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Like always, what are you going to do with the salt? At the least you would also have to pump it back as well, otherwise you'd soon end up with a massive pool of brine, and then it would fill with salt.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Best case scenario, you get something like the Salton Sea or the Dead Sea.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salton_Sea

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      isn't ocean or sea water less salty than those high salty seas?

      Also what is wrong with it?

      i see lots of green fields near Salton

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Do those green fields get their water from the Salton Sea or is it piped in from a fresh water river. We both know the answer but you can pretend that you don't if it helps your mental state.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        If you drain a river in a landlocked basin, the only way out for water is evaporation. Fresh water is still salty, just less than ocean water, so the lake would quickly see increased salinity.
        Also, you can have lush rainforests near the ocean shore, doesn't mean they get their water from it.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    i was just watching Allan Savory speaking on climate change and how hard is plant forests in hot places. he said that Arabia used billions to clean water from salt and plant trees 1% of its country and the desert is still fighting, and had a curiosity. i saw the question on other site buy answers where low energy, so i asked again here. you overprojecting mental illness all over

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    nevermind
    i found other answers
    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/would-flooding-deserts-help-stop-global-warming-n934551
    i won't ask questions here again
    you are to salty

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Did you read it? It is full of drivel like
      >The idea is “risky, unproven, even unlikely to work," according to Y Combinator.
      Since when were they an authority on anything??

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I want to live in Dunefrica where the gazelle and lions run pellmell away from the still semi-arid sandy regions as the replanting is underway, because they sense the vibrations of the worms, the worms we bio-engineered to till the sandy soil deeply and distribute the moisture so a better water table can form closer to the surface and the morning sun won't just take all the water we're piping into the area.

    The pipelines are all occupied or destroyed by raiders or stopped at the source by pirates. The colonies are in danger but for now the UN won't allow any combat with the aggressors so I have to trick far into the sands past the stomping grounds of the moisture-maker worms with my genius Nubian-Ethiopian half-breed gf. We carry as much fresh water as we possibly can, not water for the worms or the soil, just fresh drinking water for the isolated desert villages newly established in rocky areas of these lands, where the worms can't reach them.
    She's determined we must save and recycle as much water as we can, but her tired body gives out as the herds of frightened gazelle rush past below us, and the quakes from the great worm coming to devour us grow apparent. In despair and exhaustion she slumps to her knees and pees her stillsuit, forgetting in her terror to recatheterize herself and turn on the filter pump.

    Anyways yeah maybe basic irrigation would be good for Africa.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    wouldn't it make more sense to dig deeper wells and use solar to pump it out?

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Excavate huge basins in continental interior.
    >Dig channels from the ocean to those basins.
    >Water feeds the basins to create huge salt lakes.
    >Heat causes evaporation.
    >Pure water vapor leaves the lake.
    >Salt concentration increases and more ocean water flows in.
    >Process repeats until salt concentration in lake reaches maximum capacity.
    >Ocean salts now start precipitating on to the lake bottom, making it toxic for bottom life.
    >Also, rain leaches agricultural chemicals into the lakes.
    >During rainy season, salt concentration drops just enough for there to be a burst of life.
    >Dry season hits and causes massive die off.
    >The system settles into a new dynamic steady state and this cycle repeats ad infinitum.
    >You have recreated the Salton Sea.
    >A human engineered ecological disaster.

    >Alternative:
    >Create pure water to feed the lakes by nuclear powered desalinization.
    >Requires massive amounts of energy.
    >Large numbers of reactors are required.
    >Who is going to pay for it?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Wait, you forgot about the rain. sure, let's say you are right and an unlivable salt lake is formed. It still evaporates massive ammounts of water, which would fall as rain and create streams and rivers and ponds and lakes. With the heat of the sahara, the evaporation would be great and so the rain would be regular and plentyful.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Second law of thermodynamics. Not all the water that evaporates from the lakes will return. Some will be lost and make its way over other lands whose tributaries do not feed those lakes, or to the ocean itself. Ergo, there will always be ocean water flowing in without the prospect of removing salt. I suppose you could physically remove it somehow, but that would require energy, and thus cost. So, you re back in the same problem.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >Ergo, there will always be ocean water flowing in without the prospect of removing salt.
          No, no, i agree with that. There would definitely be some form of a salt lake.
          What i'm saying is, that that lake would evaporate and create fres whater via rain in other regions. So despite the original man made lake being unsuitable for life, it would create arible land via the rain it causes.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        there already exist basins, no need to dig, just dig a channel from ocean, to fill them with water

        let's say you cover 3% of Sahara with salty water, is not much of a poisoning, anyway it is covered in sand.

        Even better, we could make a pipe from Baikal, that has 25%of fresh wather of planet. and pump it in Sahara.

        I imagine that Baikal could regenerate

        >Ergo, there will always be ocean water flowing in without the prospect of removing salt.
        No, no, i agree with that. There would definitely be some form of a salt lake.
        What i'm saying is, that that lake would evaporate and create fres whater via rain in other regions. So despite the original man made lake being unsuitable for life, it would create arible land via the rain it causes.

        How long is that going to last? Do you have a reason to believe that the water stays in the Sahara once you pump it in? How do you get more water in once the lakes fill up with salt? The plan to divert a river and refill lake chad is probably the most realistic one.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      there already exist basins, no need to dig, just dig a channel from ocean, to fill them with water

      let's say you cover 3% of Sahara with salty water, is not much of a poisoning, anyway it is covered in sand.

      Even better, we could make a pipe from Baikal, that has 25%of fresh wather of planet. and pump it in Sahara.

      I imagine that Baikal could regenerate

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Or just pump sea water in one end of the sea, then pump briny water out the other side. That was easy.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Why can't you just build large long aquaducts layered with semipermeable membranes that progressively filter the salt and dump it in collection stations along the the long path to the desert it traverses instead of putting all the salt in one place at the end?

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    saw something about there having to be a desert. either in africa either instead of the amazon. Amazon gets nutrients from the desert via air currents, something of that nature. might be wrong tho

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    That would create far more arable land, and the extra vegetation would reduce CO2. Globohomosexual doesn't like that because they want to starve the population, so is not going to happen ever.

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You can't just introduce large bodies of water into arid areas and expect the land to become green, it doesn't work like that. Those areas are arid because they are dominated by high pressure caused by descending, dry air in a process known as the Hadley Cell.
    Just look at Arabia, it is surrounded by water yet still isn't lush.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      mountains seem to help

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      i saw a Dakar pov in Arabia, is not really just desert

      Also isn't the desert preventing clouds to enter inside the arid land? and if you force water inside, you force clouds too?

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Why don't we move large quantity of water in arid areas?
    because Black person population would explode and destroy the world.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Woahoho there that sounds pretty colonial to me.

      You act like anywhere else can even get positive birth rates and this isn't a demographic certainty already

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >You act like anywhere else can even get positive birth rates and this isn't a demographic certainty already
        wtf?

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Non sarcastic response: Its not done because it costs too much money and gives nothing in return.
    Its just a waste of money. A greener sahara is not worth the cost.
    You'd just make everyone poorer by doing that.

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Why not make the poles green and lush? Why not make the ocean into a rainforest? How come we dont turn the himalayas into a tropical rainforest too. We have to make everything green, we cant just co-exist with non-vegetable matter in the same planet.
    Every mineral must be coated in living vegetables.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous
  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The last 200 years of terra-forming and human intervention in ecosystems has made me superstiously believe that we really shouldn't play around with nature and conform it to our own selfish will, even with the good intention.

  19. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Where do they dredge up you drooling chucklefricks? They must go into abortion clinics and hook you out, then feed you straight corn syrup and put you to work on the internet.

  20. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Its not enough to just pump water you would have to create soil for plants to grow in.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Hydroponics says no.

  21. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    how did the Sahara use to be wet? does this mean air currents was different and another place was dry?

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *