Why is quantum computing a meme?

I have multiple questions for you morons.

Are humans just smart enough to discover it, but not smart enough to master it?

Also how long until we probably have reliable quantum computers, and how long before we have quantum computers merged with AI.

And how long before we have quantum ai improving itself?

Also what are the odds the NSA has a working quantum computer, and have probably had it for at least a decade.. making the IBM ones look like memes.

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    No clear use case.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Blow yourself up with dynamite

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      You rang?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      replacing binary states with qubits to reduce delay

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        U wut m8?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >guessing passwords
      >running simulation multitudes of times now takes one spin of the cold nugget
      >actual random number generator
      >fun-with-Jesus-and-Terry-chat program built into every unit
      >it's just cool
      When it is finally revealed that Qbit Computing has been miniaturized (lol) we are going to see a new race to accumulate cold nuggets while confused normalites remain chained to the hot boxes, typing away with curry-flavored AI in old dead languages designed by the sharting grandparents of seething glow-in-the-dark agents.
      Life is getting better all the time, you just have to keep stacking the books, keep burning out the hot hardware and pray you'll meet me at subzero temperature bars in the Oort Cloud when we can finally stop being Anon and everything is comfy.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        All of those applications are theoretical.

        Anyway I think it won't happen until we have a fuller understanding of quantum physics. Much of it is still a mystery. Right now they are just probability machines. It will be a long time before we can fully explain the results and get immediate output - right now the output is fed into a traditional computer for analysis.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It's not at all mature yet. Give it 50 years and you might start seeing it used more generally. IMO though, without a revolution in quantum computing, these devices will always require some sort of centralized system or several, which limits their applicability.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      What if there is a working one though, I believe quantum physics was first discovered in the 1920s... pretty sure the government has one somewhere.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        The first computers came about in the 19th century. There is a massive gulf between when things are first discovered/put into some use and when they become viable.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    because its fake

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    quantum computing has become vaporware year by year. each passing year it gets sadder and sadder

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I don't know but It looks like one of those mainframe computer in the 1960s and its emitting of alot of SOVL energy

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >ILLIAC IV supercomputer, 1971

      Eventually like another guy said. In 50-60 years it will be standard technology. Sooner if they're able to conjoin it with artificial intelligence, which will tell us how to get it to work.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    If it couldn't be done in the 60s, it cant be done today.
    See: lunar shuttles and spacesuits that we cant figure out how to make anymore. The engineers in the 60s were a different breed. Today's talent is lacking.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Tf are you on. We can't figure out space suits? Are you clinically moronic?

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Has anybody ever solved a problem with a quantum computer? Or at least written a program for a simulator/experimental computer that would solve a problem if it could be run on a big enough machine?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      IBM is supposedly the pioneer in the private sector for quantum computers. We don't know what the government has, but since the military is usually 30 years ahead of civilian technology, the answer to your question is more than likely yes.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >more than likely yes.
        So you don't know.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I don't know, but if I had to bet I would say yes. Considering what the private sector has vs what the military would have. Yeah...IBM has already proved it can solve complex functions but to see one as an everyday use case I would imagine that would be owned by the government.

          Looking at the timeline of how computers evolved, they had 16,000 bit computers in the 70s.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >the military is 30 years ahead
        I hate this meme so much.

        You just learned the F-22 uses 100Mhz Pentiums built on 500nm litho.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          The double slit experiment sounds like bull shit. My guess on it is that the true science behind it is locked up behind government clearances and academia has no access to this.

          That being said, it's not a leap to assume, unlike tech like AI, and other public tech, have a working quantum computer.

          I agree, with most tech they are not 30 years ahead, the industry is actually "ahead" in most areas. Like i mentioned though, with tech like this, they are likely ahead of the industry.

          That's just my laymen take on the issue, I could be very wrong.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >layman take
            Very common too, and I understand why having been there myself.

            "The military", what they do is undertake feasibility studies for future technology.
            Basically, some smart people see that we need X level of super fighter plane by year xxxx, some other very smart people draft plans and proposals to fit the requirements, and 15 years before the plane is built some very very smart people are paid to figure out how to get it done by that year xxxx. The rest is just developing designs, tech, the manufacturing chain, and making it work.
            In a generic way this flow of work applies to pretty much everything in the military.
            It isn't "the government has ultra alien computers from the year 2055" its that they use the resources to plan for and make tech advances (in the military sector) 10 and more years ahead of time, because research and development is a very long process.

            Now, things like NVDs, radar, secret-class materials like armours and stealth stuff, etc. are "30 years ahead" in the sense that they are strictly kept secrets and people arent ALLOWED to make or sell such things until that generation of thing is so old it doesn't benefit enemies.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Quick Google search says that IBM was able to solve a function using the Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm, which is used to determine whether a function is constant or balanced. In a classical computer, this would require two queries to the function for each input, whereas a quantum computer can solve the problem with only one query.

      Another example was Shor's algorithm, which can find prime factors of an integer exponentially faster than traditional computers. IBM successfully conducted this experiment on a quantum machine in 2001.

      https://www.ibm.com/quantum/blog/factor-15-shors-algorithm

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      they factored the number 21.
      they answer was 3*7

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    quantum communication is not real
    >b-but Einstein said le spooky action at a distance therefore it true!!!
    he also said God doesn't play with dice
    >b-but muh cat in a box!!!
    which is either dead or alive and not in a zombie state like pop science morons want to think

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    IIRC the main issue with quantum computing is that there is currently no RAM equivalent for quantum computations.

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