Would you be angry if Windows eventually drops 32-bit binary compatibility?

Would you be angry if Windows eventually drops 32-bit binary compatibility?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They did it 3 years ago, window 11 is 64 bit only.
    Bring a more researched shit post next time.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      not what he's talking about
      bring a more researched shit post next time

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      false, spastic.

      im more worried about linux dropping x86_32 compatibility as my home server repurposed old shitware

      https://i.imgur.com/P8yMX7I.jpg

      Would you be angry if Windows eventually drops 32-bit binary compatibility?

      will never happen.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        eventually there'll come a time when 10 years old laptops will run 99.999% of native 32bit software in an emulated environment they'll likely drop 32bit compatibility at that point and run them in an emulator

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      architectures that windows supports vs binary compatibility you can still run 32bit exe's on 64bit windows system32 strikes again maybe delete it?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        System32 is actually all 64bit.
        You'll find the 32bit stuff in SysWOW64.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    im more worried about linux dropping x86_32 compatibility as my home server repurposed old shitware

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      by the time that happens you probably wont want to touch 32 bit hardware anyway. it might not be long before package managers stop building 32 bit kernels though

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I'd guess kernel support drops within 10 years. 2038 is approaching...

        gentoo will always be an option

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Doesn't mean if the underlying instruction set is the same I shouldn't be able to run software from that time period.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I'd guess kernel support drops within 10 years. 2038 is approaching...

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        i know what you're referring to, but that won't stop it, support for 64bit time on 32bit builds was completed in linux 5.6
        now that said, software still needs to be modified to support 64bit time, so this won't magically make old binaries understand 64bit time

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      not happening any time soon
      some distros are starting to drop 32bit versions, but there will be options as long as support is in the kernel
      i386 support was dropped in 2012, and i486 support has been talked about the last couple years, but even that is still supported, that's a cpu from 1989, older than linux itself
      i don't expect i486 and i586 support to last too much longer, but i686 (1996) i don't see disappearing any time soon

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      There will always be linux support for older hardware.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    yes desktop users are not mobile users, if you can't offer long term support you're shit

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    why would they?

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    If they did that, goyslop86 would have no advantage over other instruction sets and could be easily replaced, Shittel may be angry

  6. 1 month ago
    s10fag

    >Already unusable on <4gb
    >32 bit era hardware barely works past 1709 anyways

    Why *are* they still supporting it

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      why are ~~*you*~~ a tripgay?

      >the idea of Windows dropping x86 binary compatibility sounds so unimaginable that several posters literally couldn't understand it
      lel

      The only software that requires 32-bit are old games and purpose-built commercial software that your company was too moronic to demand the source for. Which are the only two reasons to run Windows in the first place.

      why would they drop it? how does that improve windows 12 or save microsoft money?

      *it doesn't*

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >how does that improve windows 12
        Never been a concern to Microsoft for anything.
        >or save microsoft money?
        By not having to support decade-old APIs.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >By not having to support decade-old APIs.
          There is literally zero cost to maintaining what they complain about maintaining. Planned obsolescence is what they're doing here.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Why would it be zero cost to maintain all that code?

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The only software that requires 32-bit are old games and purpose-built commercial software that your company was too moronic to demand the source for. Which are the only two reasons to run Windows in the first place.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >the idea of Windows dropping x86 binary compatibility sounds so unimaginable that several posters literally couldn't understand it
      lel

      > schizo babble
      amazing

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >the idea of Windows dropping x86 binary compatibility sounds so unimaginable that several posters literally couldn't understand it
    lel

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Linux is even worse in that regard.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      how do you figure?

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    M$ will never drop 32 bit apps, Macos is a dead land thanks to arm64 and the dropping of 32 bit apps, linux distros have few apps and dropping 32 bit apps will result in a more undesirable experience

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      They WILL have to stop support sometime before 2038.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        incorrect, 64bit time support for 32bit applications is already supported by linux since 5.6 (2020)
        32bit applications that were built before then will just have the wrong time after 2038, since that's the highest year that can be represented using 32bit unix time
        basically, they'll have "y2k"-like issues, but anything that doesn't rely on accurate time will keep working

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        C++ apps and C# winforms and wpf apps will only need to be compiled to 64 bit, most of the apps will be easily ported in a short period of time, in macos you need to change a huge part of the codebase, this isn't just arm 64 bit option then compile the app

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >They WILL have to stop support sometime before 2038.
        In case you weren't aware, Windows is not affected by the 2038 bug. It's only an issue on Poonix and derivatives.

        Why are troonixers want to see WINdawgs to fail?

        >linux
        >india flag
        >severe bugs
        >completely unrelated action caused devastating consequences
        sounds like the Unix Philosophy at work

        yea, i think it's because unlike the system(16) > system32 change which required major source code changes, 32bit to 64bit was generally more straightforward, many programs you can just compile 64bit without changing anything, so perhaps they kept the library folder as "system32" just to make it easier to make 64bit builds without changing much or anything
        this explanation isn't perfect though, because of how WoW64 works, 32bit programs continue to expect system32, and WoW64 redirects them to syswow64, so why couldn't they do that to 64bit programs to make them point to system64 if they try to use system32 or something?
        idk, it's a pretty messy setup

        The "system32" path is hard coded in a lot of source code. It's to make it easier to port applications AND to make sure they don't need to add #ifdef to 100000 code files.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    ITT: People who don't know what 32-bit binary compatibility is. It means running 32 bit software on 64 bit machines. 32 bit software is still everywhere and even some new software is compiled 32 bit because it's actually faster if there be no need for 64 bit.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Would you be angry if Windows eventually drops 32-bit binary compatibility?
    I would be happy if it dropped both 32 and 64 bit and went straight to 256 bit.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Why do you need more than 64bits?

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I run old exes in Wine anyway

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    yes as it would cause many issues.

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They would never do it because the shitflinging at them would be ginormous. They already claimed Windows 10 would be the last Windows

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They will eventually, just like they did for 16-bit code.
    Its trivial enough these days to just spin up a WinXP vm so who cares?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      16-bit code was never supported on 64-bit windows. You can't drop what never existed in the first place.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Fun fact, NTVDM could run on 64bit just fine, that's why WineVDM works. NTVDM also ran on non-x86 platforms and emulated an x86 CPU

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          If microsoft bothered to implement an 8086 emulator for x86_64 then yes it could. But NTVDM is implemented using Virtual 8086 mode which can’t work when 64-bit operation is enabled.

          However protected mode 16-bit apps did exist(windows 3.x apps) and those could be run in the existing compatibility modes but because of NT autism even those use am emulated CPU under wineVDM.
          > why WineVDM works
          Uses emulation.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        so 32-bit will be dropped when 128-bit comes out

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Maybe when we start switching to Quantum computing (at least on a small scale) or are close to it.

    Too many commercial users still have ancient 32-bit base shitware and it would cause immense butthurt if they drop native support.

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Realistically won't happen unless Intel/Amd release a cpu that doesn't support 32 bit instructions.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      They're going to do it sooner or later
      https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/developer/articles/technical/envisioning-future-simplified-architecture.html

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Are compatibility layers good enough yet?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Yes, binary compatibility is the most compelling reason to use windows.

        32 bit applications will still run under this proposal, but 32 bit operating systems won't.

  19. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    no, it will just force people to rewrite old shit IN RUST

  20. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    windows should drop 64bit compatibility instead.

  21. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    linux would gain market share for old games

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      What percent of the desktop market cares that much for old games?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        maybe 1% so linux could double market share

  22. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    WineVDM would probably be upgraded to 32-bit so only a minor nuisance for me

  23. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Why are troonixers want to see WINdawgs to fail?

  24. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Already happened with W11

  25. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >computers are still 64 bit in the year 2024
    >this console was 128 bit in the year 2000
    How did they do it?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      You don't need 128bit

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The PS2 is 128-bit in the same way a modern AMD64 PC is 512-bit.

  26. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Supporting old software is sort of the whole point of Windows

  27. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    So I can delete my system32 folder then?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      no, that's where 64bit libraries go

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >64bit libraries are in system32
        >32bit libraries are in WOW64

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          *SysWOW64

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          yea, i think it's because unlike the system(16) > system32 change which required major source code changes, 32bit to 64bit was generally more straightforward, many programs you can just compile 64bit without changing anything, so perhaps they kept the library folder as "system32" just to make it easier to make 64bit builds without changing much or anything
          this explanation isn't perfect though, because of how WoW64 works, 32bit programs continue to expect system32, and WoW64 redirects them to syswow64, so why couldn't they do that to 64bit programs to make them point to system64 if they try to use system32 or something?
          idk, it's a pretty messy setup

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            actually, the second part could be explained by the fact windows started doing 64bit stuff before amd64
            like for example the first 64bit windows xp was "windows xp 64bit edition", which was for /itanium/, which had no such 32bit compatibility, so no wow64
            this is also why the amd64 version is called "x64 edition" and not the simpler "64bit edition"

  28. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Microsoft isn't just going to drop 32 bit application support, they're planning to drop the win32 API, and maybe even exit the end-user market.

    Windows users will be mad I'm sure, but they'll only have themselves to blame. Microsoft makes less from licensing Windows to users who need win32 software support, than Valve makes from users buying games to play with Proton.
    Microsoft has no business case anymore for spending billions of dollars supporting win32 for businesses still running Windows 7, or for PC Gamers who pirated Windows in the first place and will never give Microsoft a dime.
    Same reason Microsoft half-assed their DOS support and left it to rot. Who cares if a cheapskate still has some thing running on DOS? They can just use FreeDOS or DOSbox. Its not worth it for Microsoft to support it.

    Only real question is whether Microsoft tries to copy Apple, or whether they follow IBM's lead and just exit the end user market to focus on hosted solutions for paying business customers.
    They reportedly showed off Windows ARM Phones again recently, but the fact they dropped Android app support just after that probably means it was a dud.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Schizoposting troonix
      Get a job, Black person, lmao.

  29. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Someday we will be able to name a file con on a windows system. It is then and only then will we be free of the past.

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